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Joe Raedle/Getty Images(PALM BEACH, Fla.) -- A number of high-profile charitable organizations have withdrawn fundraising events and galas from President Trump's Mar-a-Lago club in Palm Beach, Florida, amid growing backlash against the president's response to the deadly violence that broke out in Charlottesville.

The Preservation Foundation of Palm Beach announced on Saturday that it was pulling out of an event at Mar-a-Lago. "The Preservation Foundation of Palm Beach is a nonprofit dedicated to protecting and celebrating the unique architectural and cultural heritage of Palm Beach. Given the current environment surrounding Mar-a-Lago, we have made the decision to move our annual dinner dance," read a message on its Facebook page.

On Friday, the Susan G. Komen Foundation, the American Red Cross and the Salvation Army all confirmed to ABC News that they are no longer going to be holding their fundraising events at Mar-a-Lago this upcoming year.

“The Salvation Army relies heavily on fundraising events like The Holiday Snow Ball in Palm Beach to further our mission of helping those in need through a range of social services including food for the hungry, relief for disaster victims, clothing and shelter for the homeless, and opportunities for the underprivileged," the Salvation Army wrote in a statement, "Because the conversation has shifted away from the purpose of this event, we will not host it at Mar-a-Lago.”

On Thursday, the American Cancer Society -- which has held events at Mar-a-Lago since 2009 -- along with the Cleveland Clinic, both announced they were pulling fundraising events scheduled at the club for next year.

"Our values and commitment to diversity are critical as we work to address the impact of cancer in every community. It has become increasingly clear that the challenge to those values is outweighing other business considerations," the American Cancer Society wrote in a statement.

These organizations join a growing list of groups that are changing the venues for their fundraising events, many saying they want to avoid being politicized.

The Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Leaders in Furthering Education (LIFE) have also said they are changing venues for events previously scheduled at Mar-a-Lago.

“America was founded on the principles of life, liberty and justice for all. In the 241 years since, millions of Americans of all religions, races, creeds, color, gender and sexual orientation have died -- and millions more have been disabled -- fighting to protect these values and freedoms. Now, however, our great nation is under siege by those who seek to undermine and obliterate these principles. Indeed, the hatred, vitriol, and anti-Semitic and racist views being spewed by neo-Nazis and white supremacists are repugnant and repulsive -- and they are antithetical to everything that this country, and I, personally stand for," Lois Pope, a philanthropist and veterans advocate who founded LIFE, wrote in a statement provided to ABC News.

Other groups that have pulled events from Mar-a-Lago include the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, American Friends of Magen David Adom and the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute.

The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society cited the security hassles of hosting an event at Mar-a-Lago as a reason for their switching venues.

Palm Beach Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Laurel Baker, who has been outspoken about organizations continuing to hold fundraising events at Mar-a-Lago, told ABC News: “I’ve been carrying around this quote with me for a while. It’s from Dante: ‘The darkest places in hell are reserved for those who maintain their neutrality in times of moral crisis.’ ”

Baker also told ABC News that she expects more and more organizations to pull events in the coming weeks, but that those decisions are best left up to the organizations themselves.

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Brent N. Clarke/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- The death of comedian and activist Dick Gregory at age 84 on Saturday prompted a flood of tributes on Twitter from celebrities, activists and others.

Jane Sanders recalled how her husband -- Bernie Sanders, Democratic senator from Vermont and former presidential candidate -- once spent a night in jail with Gregory after protesting segregation in Chicago.

RIP Dick Gregory, a good & brave man. He & @SenSanders spent the night in jail together for protesting Chicago segregated schools in the 60s https://t.co/pYpMU34eOx

— Jane O'Meara Sanders (@janeosanders) August 20, 2017

Democratic National Committee vice chairman Keith Ellison posted a photo of himself with Gregory. "Thank you for giving yourself to all of us," he wrote.

Dick Gregory, may God Bless you and Keep you. Thank you for giving yourself to all of us. pic.twitter.com/Z1dLIvYuBn

— Rep. Keith Ellison (@keithellison) August 20, 2017

Activist and writer Shaun King posted pictures of Gregory as a young man. "Rest in power, good sir," King wrote.

Because many of you probably only knew Dick Gregory as an older man, I wanted to show you these young images.

Rest in power good sir. pic.twitter.com/ZayInokcaJ

— Shaun King (@ShaunKing) August 20, 2017

Singer John Legend called Gregory a "groundbreaker in comedy and a voice for justice."

Dick Gregory lived an amazing, revolutionary life. A groundbreaker in comedy and a voice for justice. RIP

— John Legend (@johnlegend) August 20, 2017

Some people posted excerpts from Gregory's memoir, "Callous on My Soul," such as when he wrote about a waitress in the South telling him that they "don't serve colored people."

White lady: We don't serve colored people here.

Dick Gregory: I don't eat colored people. Bring me a whole fried chicken.

RIP Mr. Gregory😰 pic.twitter.com/t8dnuRJhBC

— Eugene Gu, MD (@eugenegu) August 20, 2017

Here is a sample of some other tweets paying tribute to Gregory and lamenting his passing.

Comedian Dick Gregory always told it like it is. Our laughter was fuel to fight for justice in an unjust world. RIP 1932-2017 pic.twitter.com/wpbdEkvny1

— Neil deGrasse Tyson (@neiltyson) August 20, 2017

Marching w/ King. Sitting w/ Ali. Paving the way for our comedic greats. All while fighting for us.

Rest well Dick Gregory. #blkcreatives pic.twitter.com/GsfRTjHSuy

— #blkcreatives netwrk (@blkcreatives) August 20, 2017

He taught us how to laugh. He taught us how to fight.He taught us how to live.Dick Gregory was committed to justice.I miss him already. #RIP pic.twitter.com/3CfpM2O17D

— Rev Jesse Jackson Sr (@RevJJackson) August 20, 2017

Rest In Peace to civil rights icon Dick Gregory. An inspiration. A hero. 🙏 pic.twitter.com/kIzeYMNjor

— Ricky Davila (@TheRickyDavila) August 20, 2017


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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- The numbers for the $541.9 million Powerball jackpot were drawn Saturday night -- but there was no winner.

The jackpot now jumps to $650 million. Numbers will be drawn Wednesday night. If awarded, it will be the second largest jackpot in Powerball history and the third largest among lottery jackpots in North America.

The numbers drawn Saturday were 17, 68, 19, 43 and 39. The Powerball is 13.

Last Wednesday, the jackpot was $510 million. That night's drawing failed to produce a winner.

The odds of winning are one in 292.2 million.

Powerball is played in 44 states; Washington, D.C.; Puerto Rico; and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

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Scott Eisen/Getty Images(BOSTON) -- One week after violent protests rattled Charlottesville, Virginia, a scheduled free speech rally in Boston on Saturday was met with thousands of counterprotesters, but the day went mostly smoothly, with 33 arrests but few injuries, according to police.

The free speech rally was deemed "officially over" by police ahead of its official end time, but thousands of counterprotesters continued to spread out in the city throughout the afternoon, with some protesting peacefully but others confronting officers and people.

A total of 33 arrests were made on Saturday, mostly from disorderly conduct and a few assaults on police officers, Boston Police Commissioner William Evans said at a news conference that afternoon. Some urine-filled bottles were thrown at officers, Evans said, and police indicated on Twitter that some were throwing rocks at police.

But for the most part, the day of direct action went off smoothly as police planned, with very little injury and property damage, Evans said.

"Overall, I thought we got the First Amendment people in. We got them out. No one got hurt. No one got killed," he said.

Police did stop three people with ballistic vests and a gun, Evans said. "But we were lucky to get those three out of here and confiscate the vests."

Evans said roughly 40,000 people descended upon Boston, "standing tall against hatred and bigotry in our city, and that's a good feeling." He added that he wished the "troublemakers stayed away," who he said weren't there for either the free speech side or the counterprotesters' side, but "were here just to cause problems."

Evans said "99.9 percent of the people here were for the right reasons -- that's to fight bigotry and hate."

 Saturday's massive gathering of demonstrators across Boston was sparked by a free speech rally set to take place from noon to 2 p.m. at Boston Common. But the rally was deemed "officially over" in a tweet from Boston police at 1:30 p.m. ET, and police said the demonstrators had left the Common.

Libertarian congressional candidate Samson Racioppi, who was set to speak at the free speech event, told ABC affiliate WCVB-TV, "I really think it was supposed to be a good event by the organizers, but it kind of fell apart."

An organizer of the free speech event said the group has no affiliation with the white supremacists involved in the violence in Charlottesville, but a small number of Ku Klux Klan members were expected to attend, WCVB-TV reported.

After the free speech event concluded, counterprotesters still swarmed Boston, and riot police also responded in the city.

The giant crowds of counterprotesters first gathered in the city Saturday morning holding signs with phrases that said "Hate speech is not free speech" and "White silence is violence."

Counter protesters with #FightSupremacy groups gather on MLK Blvd in #Roxbury before heading to the #BostonCommon. #counterprotest #WCVB pic.twitter.com/qKO9WoCa95

— Sangita Chandra (@sangichandra) August 19, 2017

Near the entrance to the rally, counterprotesters chanted, "No fascists, no KKK, no racist USA."

"No fascists" chants near entrance to #freespeechrally entrance. #Boston #wcvb pic.twitter.com/u7zUQnfayz

— David Bienick (@BienickWCVB) August 19, 2017

One Massachusetts woman who drove three hours to Boston to attend Saturday's counterprotest told ABC News that she has felt "months of depression" and "absolute outrage."

And after what happened in Charlottesville, she said, "I just cannot be silent anymore."

Of the free speech rally attendees, she said, "I was glad to see that their crowd was very small. That spoke volumes to me.

"We have a really long way to go, and we have to end white supremacy in all of its forms."

Another counterprotester told ABC News, "I just wanted to come out and confront them head on, and I didn't want to miss this chance."

"I didn't think that we would ever have to have this confrontation in 2017," she said, "so it feels really vital to just come out and try to stamp it out today. And I'm encouraged by how many other people came out."

While many counterprotesters marched peacefully, some scuffled with armed officers.

Video showed several officers taking an individual to the ground after he angrily confronted the officers.

Amid the confrontations, Boston police tweeted that individuals are asked to "refrain from throwing urine, bottles and other harmful projectiles at our officers."

#BPD is asking individuals to refrain from throwing urine, bottles and other harmful projectiles at our officers.

— Boston Police Dept. (@bostonpolice) August 19, 2017

President Trump on Saturday afternoon thanked the police in a tweet, saying they look "tough and smart" against what he said appeared to be "anti-police agitators."

Looks like many anti-police agitators in Boston. Police are looking tough and smart! Thank you.

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) August 19, 2017

Trump also tweeted, "I want to applaud the many protestors in Boston who are speaking out against bigotry and hate. Our country will soon come together as one." Boston Mayor Marty Wash responded to that message by saying that his city stood together for "peace and love."

I want to applaud the many protestors in Boston who are speaking out against bigotry and hate. Our country will soon come together as one!

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) August 19, 2017

First daughter Ivanka Trump on Saturday night also tweeted.

2:2 We must continue to come together, united as Americans! 🇺🇸

— Ivanka Trump (@IvankaTrump) August 20, 2017

Boston officials said they planned to deploy hundreds of police officers to prevent violence similar to what took place in Charlottesville last weekend, where a rally by white nationalists, including neo-Nazis, skinheads and Ku Klux Klan members demonstrating over plans to remove a Robert E. Lee statue, ended in the death of a counterprotester after a car was rammed into a crowd that was marching through the streets.

"We're going to respect their right to free speech,” Boston Mayor Marty Walsh said Friday, but "they don't have the right to create unsafe conditions."

Scheduled to speak at the free speech rally, which was organized by the Boston Free Speech Coalition, were Kyle Chapman, who caused controversy online after photos emerged of him hitting anti-Trump protesters; Joe Biggs, who previously worked at the website InfoWars, run by conservative radio host Alex Jones; Republican congressional candidate Shiva Ayyadurai; and Racioppi.

John Medlar, who said he is an organizer for Boston Free Speech, said the group has no affiliation with the white supremacists who marched in Charlottesville, Boston.com reported.

"While we maintain that every individual is entitled to their freedom of speech -- and defend that basic human right -- we will not be offering our platform to racism or bigotry. We denounce the politics of supremacy and violence," the group wrote on its Facebook page.

The group is largely made up of students in their mid-teens to mid-20s, Medlar told Boston.com.

WCVB-TV reported that the KKK’s national director, Thomas Robb, said as many as five KKK members from Springfield and possibly more from Boston were planning to attend Saturday's rally.

“They might be holding signs about free speech, but they're not going to say anything about the KKK or anything," Robb said ahead of the rally, according to WCVB-TV. "I mean, they might. I don't know. They didn't really say."

Evans said Friday that while he believes "a few troublemakers" will attend the rally, police will be "working the crowd real closely."

Anything that can be used as a weapon, including backpacks and sticks, have been banned from the rally, WCVB-TV reported.

Demonstrators should even avoid using sticks to hold up their posters, Evans said.

The permit for the event allows the rally to take place between noon and 2 p.m., according to the Boston Globe.

Other rallies are planned across the U.S. on Saturday, many of which are in response to Charlottesville, the movement to remove Confederate statues across the country and Donald Trump’s controversial press conference on Tuesday.

Rallies are planned in Austin; Dallas; Houston; Atlanta; New Orleans; and Grand Rapids, Michigan.

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iStock/Thinkstock(MADRAS, Ore.) -- Two dead after a plane crashed  in Willow Creek Canyon in Oregon, this afternoon.
The location of the crash is approximately one mile south of the Madras Airport runway.

Deputies from the Jefferson County Sheriff's Office, Oregon State Troopers, along with Jefferson County Fire and Emergency Medical Services responded to the scene.

According to emergency responders, the plane was found fully engulfed in flames near the top of the canyon.

According to the  Jefferson County Sheriff's Office , the two occupants on board did not survive the crash.
The small fire that occurred was contained and is now being cleaned up. No other property was damaged.

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board are investigating.

Witnesses are being interviewed at this time.
 
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iStock/Thinkstock(KISSIMMEE, Fla.) -- Two policemen have died after six law enforcement officers were shot in three different U.S. cities on Friday night, their respective agencies have confirmed.

In central Florida, two officers with the Kissimmee Police Department were shot, according to Police Chief Jeffrey O'Dell.

Officer Matthew Baxter, a three-year veteran, died from his wound. The other officer, 10-year veteran Sgt. Sam Howard, remains in "grave critical condition," and "the prognosis does not look good," O'Dell said at a press conference early Saturday morning.

At a later press conference, the police chief announced they had arrested suspect Everett Glenn Miller for premeditated first-degree murder. Miller will be booked at Osceola County Jail in Kissimmee, which is located about 23 miles south of Orlando.

O'Dell said they do not anticipate any other arrests or charges. Earlier, the police chief said officers were investigating several suspicious persons.

Florida Gov. Rick Scott said the fallen officer was a "married father of three and a dedicated law enforcement hero in central Florida."

"My heart breaks for Matthew's family. May Matthew's service and the service of our law enforcement community be a constant reminder of the sacrifice of those who serve to keep us safe," Scott said in a statement Saturday. "Following last night's shooting, I have been in touch with local law enforcement and community officials to let them know that our state supports them every step of the way."

President Donald Trump reacted to the shootings in Kissimmee, saying in a tweet early Saturday that the police department is in his "thoughts and prayers," adding "We are with you."

My thoughts and prayers are with the @KissimmeePolice and their loved ones. We are with you!#LESM

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) August 19, 2017


Meanwhile, in northeastern Florida, the Jacksonville Sheriff's Office announced that two of its officers were shot by one suspect who was armed with a "high-powered rifle" late Friday night.

The officers were responding to 911 call about an attempted suicide at a home around 11 p.m. ET. They heard gunfire coming from inside the house and attempted to make entry. But as they approached, the suspect began shooting at the officers through the door, according to the sheriff's office.

One officer was shot in both hands, while the other was shot in the stomach. One remains in critical condition and the other is in stable condition, the sheriff's office said.

The suspect was shot and killed by officers.

Three other people inside the house at the time of the incident hid in a back bedroom for safety. They are all safe, according to the sheriff's office.

"Let me be very clear -- last night's violence against our law enforcement community is reprehensible and has no place in our state," Scott said in a statement Saturday. "Florida has zero tolerance for violence, and we will not accept hatred for one second."

Hundreds of miles away in western Pennsylvania, two Pennsylvania State Police troopers were shot in Fairchance on Friday night. Both troopers are in stable condition and expected to survive, according to Pennsylvania State Police spokesperson Melinda Bondarenka.

The suspect in that shooting is dead, Bondarenka told ABC News.

According to Uniontown Hospital spokesperson Josh Krysak, one of the injured troopers was brought there for treatment.

"I can confirm that one state police trooper was brought to Uniontown Hospital for treatment of injuries suffered in a shooting incident in Fairchance this evening," Krysak told ABC News. "The injuries suffered by this officer are not life-threatening."

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Dressed in a dark blazer and a polka-dot tie, ABC News' Frank Reynolds anchored the network's live coverage of a total solar eclipse 38 years ago.

Although the celestial phenomenon on Feb. 26, 1979, was only visible from the Pacific Northwest, it was the last total solar eclipse over the contiguous United States to take place that century. And just like this year, the rare event captured the imagination of the nation.

"Good morning. This is indeed a special-events broadcast of a genuine special event: the last total eclipse of the sun over the continent this century," Reynolds said from ABC News' studio in New York City. "The moon is moving between the sun and the earth and across a relatively narrow strip of the northwestern United States and central Canada."

ABC News broadcast the solar eclipse live from various locations within the path of totality. Viewers watched as the moon's shadow blocked the sun's beaming face in broad daylight over Portland, Oregon, and the city plunged into darkness at around 8:14 a.m. PT.

The experienced lasted just over two minutes there.

"Welcome back to daylight, Portland," Reynolds laughed, as the live shot of the city showed a bright sky.

Another live shot of the total solar eclipse from Montana's capital city of Helena captured the solar corona, the sun's outer atmosphere that is usually obscured by glare but appears as a ring of ethereal white wisps around the moon as it blocks the solar surface. Cheers and applause rang out from the crowd in Helena in the heart of the Rocky Mountains.

"The light here is eerie. It's a yellowish gray on the horizon," ABC News' Ron Miller said while reporting on location.

Soon after, the sun emerged from behind the moon, creating the "diamond ring" effect over Helena, and the crowd roared in awe.

“So that’s it -- the last solar eclipse to be seen on this continent in this century," Reynolds said before signing off. "And as I said, not until August 21, 2017, will another eclipse be visible from North America. That’s 38 years from now.

"May the shadow of the moon fall on a world in peace. ABC News, of course, will bring you a complete report on that next eclipse 38 years from now."

On Monday, starting at 10 a.m. PT/1 p.m. ET, ABC News' David Muir will lead the network's live coverage of the astronomical event from within the path of totality.


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Prince George's County Police Department(CLINTON, Md.) -- A man has been arrested in connection with the discovery of three girls under age 10 found dead in a home in Maryland, police said. One of the girls was the sister of the man now in custody, authorities said.

Antonio Williams, 25, was arrested and is a suspect in the killing of the three girls -- two 6-year-olds and one 9-year-old -- Prince George's County police said in a press release. He faces charges of first- and second-degree murder and related charges.

The girls were found with stab wounds Friday morning by authorities after the mother of the suspect came home from work and found the three young victims. All three were pronounced dead at the scene, police said.

Williams is a brother of one of the 6-year-olds. The other two girls are sisters from Newark, New Jersey. They are daughters of a relative of Williams's mother, police said.

The three girls were found in a basement bedroom in bed, police said. A 2-year-old was also home but was unharmed, police said.

Police said in a news release that Williams "had sole care and custody of the children at the home overnight into Friday."

The suspect's mother was working an overnight shift and the suspect was left in charge, police said.

Police said, "He has confessed to killing the victims. Detectives are working to establish a motive in this case."

Williams is "in custody of the Department of Corrections on a no-bond status," police said.

Prince George's County Police Assistant Chief Hector Velez said Friday that the community is "grieving the loss of three beautiful young children."

"I wear a uniform, but I am a father," Velez said.

Jennifer Donelan, director of media relations for the Prince George's County Police Department, said it was one of the "most difficult scenes" the department's officers have ever seen.

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iStock/Thinkstock(BOSTON) -- Boston is adequately prepared for Saturday’s “free speech” rally, city officials said, despite the elevated tension and rhetoric that followed the deadly violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, last weekend.

More than 500 police officers will be on hand for the Boston Free Speech Coalition's event so that "we don’t have an incident ... like last week in Virginia,” Mayor Marty Walsh said Friday.

"We're going to respect their right to free speech,” Walsh said, but "they don't have the right to create unsafe conditions."

“We don’t want hate groups to come to our city or state,” he added.

Boston Free Speech, the group behind the rally, has invited a number of groups to speak. There are four headliners listed on the Boston Free Speech Facebook page, including Kyle Chapman, who made waves online after photos of his hitting anti-Trump protesters were shared widely. Another scheduled headliner is Joe Biggs, who previously worked at the site InfoWars, which is run by conservative radio host Alex Jones. Republican congressional candidate Shiva Ayyadurai and Libertarian congressional candidate Samson Racioppi are also listed as headliners.

John Medlar, who says he is an organizer for Boston Free Speech, said the group has no affiliation with the white supremacists who marched in Charlottesville last weekend, Boston.com reported.

His group is largely made up of students in their mid-teens to mid-20s who live around the city, Medlar told the news website.

The group’s permit limits the rally to noon to 2 p.m., according to the Boston Globe.

Boston Police Commissioner Billy Evans on Friday said "we're going to be really working the crowd real closely."

"It's that little percentage that wants to cause problems that we're going to watch," Evans said.

The city has been working with “free speech” group organizers and protesters in advance of the event, Evans said, and they have been encouraged not to bring any weapons. Even posters should have no sticks attached to them for fear that they could be used as weapons, he added.

Evans also criticized the publicity surrounding the event, saying that because of "the frenzy over the last six days," the Boston rally has been portrayed "like a showdown."

"I hope anyone who protests and is marching is doing it for the right reason," Evans said, though conceding, "unfortunately, I think there's going to be a few troublemakers here."

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images(CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va.) -- The mayor of Charlottesville, Virginia, wants the statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee removed from the city’s center, he said in a statement Friday, explaining that such “monuments were transformed from equestrian statues into lightning rods" at last weekend’s deadly white nationalist protest sparked by the city's plans to remove the statue.

“We can, and we must, respond by denying the Nazis and the KKK and the so-called alt-right the twisted totem they seek," Mayor Mike Signer said in a statement Friday.

He said he is calling on the governor to convene an emergency meeting of the state General Assembly to allow Charlottesville to remove the statue.

Signer is also pushing for legislation to permit "localities to ban the open or concealed carry of weapons in public events reasonably deemed to pose a potential security threat," according to a news release.

“In a new age of domestic terrorism, we need to re-examine the balance that we strike between public safety and violent protests,” Signer said. "It should not be acceptable to open-carry or concealed-carry firearms at an event of the sort we saw last weekend."

The mayor's statement comes six days after a Unite the Right rally sparked by Charlottesville's plan to remove the Lee statue from a local park turned deadly. The rally was attended by neo-Nazis, skinheads and Ku Klux Klan members. They were met with hundreds of counterprotesters, which led to street brawls and violent clashes.

A driver plowed into counterprotesters, killing Heather Heyer, 32, and injuring several others. The suspected driver is in custody, facing charges including second-degree murder.

Signer said Friday, "Heather Heyer’s memorial service was a profound turning point for me and many others. Her mother said, 'They tried to kill my child to shut her up. But guess what? You just magnified her.' I realized at Heather’s memorial service that that our Confederate statues’ historical meaning has been changed forever. In other words, it will never be possible again for the Lee statue to only tell the story of what happened here during the Civil War and the Jim Crow era. Its historical meaning now, and forevermore, will be of a magnet for terrorism."

Signer said Friday he also plans to bring proposals to the City Council and to community stakeholders for ways to memorialize Heyer's name and legacy.

Despite the "painful" event, "we’re not going to let them define us,” Signer told ABC News earlier this week of the agitators.

"They’re not going to tell our story," he said. "We’re going to tell our story. And outsiders -- their time has come and gone. This city is back on their feet and we’re going to be better than ever despite this."

Signer compared his hopes for Charlottesville's recovery to the aftermath of the Charleston, South Carolina, church shooting in June 2015 that killed nine people. The gunman in that attack said he wanted to start a race war but the tragedy instead united the city.

"There’s a memorial right now in front of Charlottesville City Hall that’s flowers and a heart that talks about the love that we have here. Those are the images that are going to replace these horrific ones from this weekend. That’s the work that we have as a country," Signer said.

"That’s what happened in Charleston. There were those horrible images of those people bloodied and killed and weeping from the church. But they were replaced quickly, steadily, by the work that started to happen. By people who said, 'You’re not going to tell our story for us. We’re going to tell our story.'

"And that’s what’s happening in this community. That’s my work as the mayor here -- is not to allow these hateful people who just don’t get this country to define us," he said. "And they’re not going to define us."

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Courtesy of Eddie Gonzalez(SAN ANTONIO) -- Hope Rhoades, 3, is having the best week ever.

The San Antonio Fire Department surprised her with a bike, training wheels, helmet and knee pads after learning her family couldn’t afford one.

“She was just through the moon,” Hope’s mom, Brandy Rhoades, 36, told ABC News.

The paramedics first met Hope when they were called to her house because of a small emergency.

“We were outside and she ran up the stairs and I was telling her to come down because it was dangerous and she starts coming down and she misstepped and she took a tumble,” her mom explained. "They checked her out and she was OK and she connected really well with one of the paramedics because he has a daughter too."

The emergency workers noticed that Hope’s family seemed to have limited financial means and wanted to do something special for her.

Paramedic Rene Bocanegra noticed Hope playing with a Monster High doll and remembered his daughter had outgrown her Monster High bike, and knew Hope would love to have it.

After a few failed attempts, his colleagues were finally able to drop the bike off, much to the surprise of the family.

“I was speechless. I was so moved that I was actually starting to cry,” said Rhoades. “They made her day. My daughter was just so incredibly happy. They were able to fulfill a dream for her that I couldn’t.”

Eddie Gonzalez, an engineer with the fire department, captured the heartwarming moment on camera and shared it on Facebook.

Rhoades said her daughter’s birthday was on Aug. 6 so the new bike couldn’t have come at a better time.

“I can’t think of guys with more open arms or big hearts,” said the overjoyed mom. “We are so thankful. My daughter is so happy. All she can talk about is her bike and their fire truck and their ambulance."

Bocanegra said Hope is a sweet little girl who was already asking her mom if she could wear her new knee pads and helmet all day.

“Watching her smile today was awesome,” he said.

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Ingram Publishing(PARADISE, Nev.) -- A California woman made the most of her time spent waiting at McCarran International Airport Tuesday by scoring more than a million dollars, according to the airport's Facebook page.

A woman identified by the airport as Sandra A. from Dublin, California, tried her luck on the Wheel of Fortune slot machine in the airport's C concourse.

Her gamble paid off when she hit the jackpot, winning more than $1.6 million, according to the airport.

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ABC News(CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va.) -- The mother of Heather Heyer, the woman killed Saturday when a car rammed into a crowd of counterprotesters at a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, said she has "no interest" in speaking with President Donald Trump in the wake of her daughter's death.

"I understand that President Trump wants to speak with me; I've heard from his press secretary and a few other people. And it's not that I'm trying to be calloused. It's that I have no interest in speaking to politicians just to hear them say, 'I'm sorry,'" Susan Bro said in an interview Thursday with ABC News. "If I felt like that's all they wanted to say, that would be different, but I feel like I'm wanted to be used for political agendas and I'm resistant to that."

Bro thanked Trump in a statement on Monday for "those words of comfort and for denouncing those who promote violence and hatred," but said on Friday in an interview with Robin Roberts on Good Morning America that her opinion changed after she had time to watch news coverage of the Charlottesville protests after laying her 32-year-old daughter to rest on Wednesday.

"I hadn’t really watched the news until last night, and I’m not talking to the president now, after what he said," Bro said, adding that she "saw an actual clip of him at a press conference equating the protesters" with "the KKK and the white supremacists."

She continued, "You can’t wash this one away by shaking my hand and saying, ‘I’m sorry.’ I’m not forgiving for that."

When asked Friday if there was anything she would want to say to Trump, Bro said, "Think before you speak."

Many have criticized Trump's response to Saturday's "Unite the Right" rally, which was attended by white nationalists, neo-Nazis and Ku Klux Klan members, and turned deadly after a car plowed into counterprotesters, killing Heyer and injuring 19 others. In a news conference Tuesday in Trump Tower, Trump reiterated that "both sides" were to blame for the violence.

Bro told ABC News on Thursday that she has "heard it said that there was violence on both sides, that everybody was hurting everybody."

"I wasn't there that day, but I will tell you that I'm pretty sure that's the only person that ran people down with a car, so that level of violence didn't take place on both sides. That did not happen," she said.

"I've heard it said that the murder of my daughter was part of making America great," Bro added. "The blood on the streets -- is that what made America great? Attacking innocent people with a vehicle -- is that what made America great?"

When asked if she had sympathy for the cause of the white nationalists, Bro said, "I don't know what their cause is. I haven't heard what's bothering them."

Bro clarified Friday on Good Morning America that her daughter, a paralegal who lived in Charlottesville, was not part of any organized group protesting in her hometown, saying, "She was part of a group of human beings who cared to protest."

"I'm honestly a little embarrassed to say that part of the reason Heather got so much attention is because she's white, and she stood up for black people," Bro told ABC News on Thursday. "Isn't that a shame? That a white person standing up for a black person caused all this excitement? That should be an everyday thing. That should be a norm."

Bro said she is now dedicating herself to "forward Heather's mission."

"A lot of people are already aware of injustice. It's not that they're not aware; it's that they won't do anything about it," Bro said on Thursday. "'I'm afraid, I'm afraid' -- that's what I keep hearing, and that's what the murder of my daughter and the injury of several others was intended to do -- was to make people afraid."

"But if we live in fear, then they've won," she said, calling on people to "get involved" when they witness injustices.

"Heather was not a politician, but she was interested in changing people," Bro said. "My focus is not on politics; my focus is on human beings and on how we as human beings can fix problems."

Bro did not allow politicians to speak at the memorial service for Heyer on Wednesday, which was attended by more than 1,000 people.



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Wavebreak Media/Thinkstock(LEXINGTON, N.C.) -- Attorneys for former FBI agent Tom Martens and his 33-year-old daughter, Molly Martens Corbett, who were found guilty of second-degree murder last week, are attempting to have the convictions set aside because of alleged juror misconduct, according to documents obtained by ABC News.

A jury of nine women and three men delivered the verdict after less than four hours of deliberation, concluding that the father and daughter intentionally and unlawfully killed Corbett's husband, 39-year-old Irishman Jason Corbett, beating him to death with a child’s baseball bat and a paving stone at the Corbett home in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, in August 2015.

The pair claimed self-defense and defense of others in Corbett’s death. During the three-and-a-half-week trial, Tom Martens took the witness stand, telling jurors he was staying at his daughter’s home when he was woken up by noises upstairs. Martens testified that he found his son-in-law, Jason Corbett, with his hands around his daughter’s neck, threatening to kill her.

Defense attorneys now claim in a motion, filed Wednesday in a Davidson County court, that “voluntary press interviews,” including one with ABC News Correspondent Linzie Janis, a post-verdict press conference by the jury foreman and “social media posts” of certain jurors reveal misconduct.

The motion alleges that the press interviews and social media posts show that the jurors were discussing the case among themselves both “prior to closing arguments and during deliberations, both inside and outside the courthouse,” despite explicitly and repeatedly being instructed not to do so by the judge.

The motion states that the jury foreman, Tom Aamland, made a statement during a press conference after the trial that he and his fellow jurors had “private conversations” that indicated how jurors were leaning in their decision ahead of the jury deliberation period.

Defense attorneys Walter C. Holton and David Freedman also allege that Aamland and one of the other jurors met in a parked vehicle for 10 to 15 minutes during deliberations. The attorneys are asking for a hearing to explore the content of that and all other “private conversations.”

The motion filed on behalf of Martens and Molly Martens Corbett accused the jury of forming opinions about Corbett’s character and mental health despite the fact that she never took the stand, allegedly violating her Sixth Amendment right to trial by a fair and impartial jury. The motion quotes juror Nancy Perez in her interview with Janis for ABC News' 20/20 in which she said, “I think Molly is a person that has not been ever held accountable for any actions whatsoever. I think Molly was Daddy’s princess, just like every girl in Daddy’s eyes. I feel like Molly was very manipulative.”

The motion also describes what one of the jurors told 20/20 they believed happened the night of the murder. “Molly was the aggressor, striking her husband first with the paving stone while he was asleep in bed,” the motion states. The defense attorneys call that belief a direct contradiction to the court’s finding that there was no evidence of Molly Corbett's being the aggressor.

The state has 10 days to respond to the motion. Davidson County District Attorney Garry Frank tells ABC News, “We do not believe the motion, under our law, has any merit. We are preparing a response to be filed next week.”

Molly Martens Corbett and Tom Martens were each sentenced to 20 to 25 years in prison.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- A missing woman thought to be dead emerged from the woods after 28 days, naked and visibly sick, but still alive.

Lisa Theris was last seen on July 18 and her family feared the worst.

Yet last Saturday. a woman driving down a country road outside of Union Springs, Alabama, spotted her and called police 911 dispatchers.

"I just passed a road and there's a lady that, she came out of the woods naked and she's been sick. She's been in the woods for three weeks," the caller told 911 dispatchers.

Police thought the young woman had lost about 40 pounds and noted she had suffered deep cuts, bug bites, poison ivy stings and sunburn.

Theris told ABC News that she survived on eating berries, mushrooms and drinking puddles of water.

"If it rained I'd have to like squeeze the water out of my hair and drink it," Theris, a former waitress and radiology student, said.

"She went on, "It was all about finding the road or finding a person. I couldn't even hear any cars the whole time I was out there until the end."

Theris said she found a large walking stick in the forest that she said helped her make it out of the wilderness.

How the young woman ended up lost in the first place remains unclear. Neither Theris nor police have provided an explanation for how she got stuck in the woods, but officials said she was with two men she had recently met.

"When asked if she thought she was drugged, Theris responded, "It would make sense, but I'm not sure."

"I think I heard that may be so," her father, William Theris, added.

Theris admitted that around the time she went missing, she was supposed to appear in court on a misdemeanor disorderly conduct charge. That case was dropped last Thursday when the court presumed she had died.

Police told ABC News they believe Theris survived in the woods, but say there's a lot more to her story.

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