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vmargineanu/iStock(HARMONTOWN, Miss.) -- Authorities are investigating the mysterious death of a 21-year-old Ole Miss student whose body was discovered over the weekend.

Deputies were on a routine patrol Saturday around 10:30 a.m. when they found the body of Alexandria "Ally" Kostial in Harmontown, Miss., about 30 miles from Ole Miss, according to the Lafayette County Sheriff's Office.

Sheriff's officials have not released her cause of death, but said "it is apparent that foul play was involved."

"We are not releasing many of the details [as] this is an active investigation," sheriff's officials said in a statement Monday.

Investigators are "following several leads," the sheriff's department added.

Kostial was from St. Louis, Mo., and was studying marketing at the University of Mississippi's School of Business Administration, according to the sheriff's office and the university.

"We are truly saddened by the death of Alexandria Kostial," University of Mississippi Interim Chancellor Larry Sparks said in a statement. "Ally was a valued member of our campus community. We extend our deepest sympathy to her family, friends, and classmates, and stand ready to support them during this time."

Before attending Ole Miss, Kostial graduated in 2016 from Lindbergh High School in St. Louis, according to the school district.

"Our hearts are broken for the Kostials, and we extend our deepest sympathies to her entire family during this time," Lindbergh Schools spokeswoman Beth Johnston told ABC News via email.

Authorities ask anyone with information to call the Lafayette County Sheriff's Department at 662-234-6421 or Crime Stoppers at 662-234-8477.

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Michael Doosey/Tulane University(NEW ORLEANS) -- Scientists have discovered a new species of tiny shark that glows in the dark in the Gulf of Mexico.

Researchers first happened upon what is now known as Mollisquama mississippiensis, or the American Pocket Shark, in 2010 while observing the feeding of sperm whales in the gulf, according to a new Tulane University study published in the animal taxonomy journal Zootaxa.

The shark was collected, and Mark Grace of the National Marine Fisheries Service Mississippi Laboratories of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration noticed its special features while examining the collected specimens for a NOAA survey in 2013, according to a statement from Tulane University.

Meet the American pocket shark, Mollisquama mississippiensis: A wee little shark found in the Gulf of Mexico that squirts little glowing clouds from mysterious pouches near its front fins. Amazing. https://t.co/jVPWNiWU8G pic.twitter.com/kzdRumXHIo

— Shark Advocates (@SharkAdvocates) July 21, 2019

The newly discovered shark, which measures in at just 5.5 inches, releases a bioluminescent fluid to attract prey, according to the study. It is a subspecies of the kitefin shark.

The only other known specimen of its kind was captured in the eastern Pacific Ocean in 1979 and is housed at the Zoological Museum in St. Petersburg, Russia. However, both are "separate species, each from separate oceans," said Grace said.

"The fact that only one pocket shark has ever been reported from the Gulf of Mexico, and that it is a new species, underscores how little we know about the gulf," said Henry Bart, director of the Tulane Biodiversity Research Institute.

Both species are "exceedingly rare," Grace said. Notable differences include fewer vertebrae in the shark and numerous light-producing photophores that cover much of the body in Gulf shark, but both have two small pockets that produce luminous fluid, one on each side of its gills.

Other glow-in-the-dark sharks previously discovered include the Scyliorhinus rotifer, a chain catshark, and the swell shark, which has a "twinkling" pattern, according to Live Science.

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iStock(NEW YORK) -- Blowing whistles, waving red, white and blue Puerto Rican flags and demanding the immediate resignation of the governor, tens of thousands of protesters Monday morning showed their outrage by shutting down a major freeway in the U.S. territory's capital and imploring those who feel the same to join an island-wide strike.

Some protesters spent the night at a baseball stadium in the capital of San Juan and were joined at daylight by a crowd that grew through the morning, fueled by anger that Gov. Ricardo Rossello has defiantly refused to step down.

"That's not enough. We need him out. We need a good governor. We need leadership," protester Daphne Lebron told ABC News.

"How can someone who belittles his own country represent us," said Torres, who was born and raised on the Caribbean island.

Monday's protest is expected to be the largest to unfold since the release of explosive text messages between the governor and his top aides and advisers in which they allegedly made homophobic, misogynistic and sexist comments against opponents and critics, and mocked victims of Hurricane Maria.

Torres echoed the sentiment of the demonstrators, saying they no longer trust the Rossello administration, which has been criticized for mismanagement in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria in 2017. The governor's former education secretary and the former head of Puerto Rico's Health Insurance Administration were both indicted on fraud charges connected to federal funds.

"We want a government that really represents us, that is working there for the people of Puerto Rico and not for their own benefit and the benefit of their own friends," protester Daphne Lebron told ABC News.

Lebron, who was also born and raised in Puerto Rico, said the leaked text messages of Rossello and his inner circle using offensive language to demean Puerto Rican citizens was just the last straw in a series of debacles and scandals.

She questioned where all the U.S. financial aid that supposedly poured into the island to help it recover from Hurricane Maria, which caused widespread damage and killed nearly 3,000 people, went in the end.

"Where did all those funds go, where did everything that we were supposed to get as a town as a country, that we needed at that time go to? We didn't get it and they were having parties and enjoying the good life," Lebron alleged of the Rossello administration.

Organizers are hoping that by the end of the day a million people will have participated in the demonstration, which comes just six days after police dressed in riot gear dispersed a massive crowd of protesters near the governor's mansion in San Juan by deploying pepper spray.

Organizers claimed that 500,000 people, including singer Ricky Martin, participated in Wednesday's protest.

By 10 a.m. Monday, the crowd had swelled to tens of thousands of protesters who began marching en masse from the Hiram Bithorn Stadium south of the San Juan business district to a major freeway nearby, where they stopped traffic -- an attempt to cripple business in the downtown area.

Organizers heralded the demonstration as the "Marcha del Pueblo," or "the People's March," and called on all Puerto Rican citizens to go on an island-wide strike until the governor steps down.

In a Facebook Live statement Sunday evening, the embattled Rossello announced that he will not seek reelection in November 2020 but will not resign.

Rossello said he will step down as the president of the New Progressive Party. He said he will serve out his term as governor and allow for his successor to be democratically elected.

"Apologizing is not enough," Rossello said in the Facebook Live announcement, adding that he is prepared to take on the process that could lead to his impeachment.

“I announce that I will not seek reelection as governor next year. Additionally, I am resigning as president of the New Progressive Party. Finally, I should be respectful of the constitutional order and I welcome the process by the legislative assembly which I will confront with all the truth, strength and in a responsible manner,” Rossello said. "To every Puerto Rican: I have heard you, and I hear you today. I have committed errors and I have apologized. I am a good man that has a grand love for my island and for all."

The governor has faced mounting pressure to resign since private online chat messages on the Telegram app were leaked earlier this month.

Rossello, 40, the second youngest governor in Puerto Rican history and the son of former Gov. Pedro Rossello, was sworn in as governor of the U.S. territory on Jan. 2, 2017, amid turmoil over a debt crisis and 13 straight years of recession.

Just eight months after his election, Hurricane Maria hit the island and caused widespread death and destruction, sending Puerto Rico deeper into financial turmoil.

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iStock(JAMESTOWN, R.I.) -- Three dogs died after they were left in a car in Rhode Island during Sunday's scorching heat wave, authorities said.

Officers in Jamestown responded to a report of three dogs unresponsive in a car outside a grocery store at around 4 p.m., according to Jamestown police.

The dogs -- a 4-year-old black lab, a 7-month-old black lab and a 4 -year-old gray Keeshond -- were taken to an animal hospital but none could be revived, according to police.

The pets had been left in the car without water for an "extended period of time," according to police. The windows were rolled up and the air conditioning didn't appear to be working, authorities said.

The temperature climbed to 95 degrees in Jamestown on Sunday, with the heat index making it feel like 110 degrees.

The dogs' owner, 65-year-old Ann Garnett of Jamestown, was charged with three counts of unnecessary cruelty to an animal and three counts of confinement of an animal in a motor vehicle, authorities said.

Garrett was arraigned at Jamestown Police Headquarters and released, according to police.

Unnecessary cruelty to an animal is a felony that can lead to a sentence of five years in prison if convicted, according to police.

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MattGush/iStock(MIAMI) -- A Florida sheriff's department is mourning one of its deputies who was killed in a car crash as he was responding to a domestic dispute, authorities said.

The Broward sheriff's deputy was heading to the call around 3 a.m. Sunday when he collided with a pickup truck, according to the Broward Sheriff's Office.

A second deputy who had been following in a separate car witnessed the crash and immediately called for help, officials said.

The deputy, whose name has not yet been released, died at a hospital. He was on the force for a little over a year, officials said, according to ABC Miami affiliate WPLG-TV.

The pickup truck driver was hospitalized in stable condition, officials said.

"Our hearts are heavy," sheriff's officials tweeted. "We ask for thoughts and prayers."

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ABC News(NEW YORK) -- The heat wave has ended in the Midwest and is ending Monday morning in the Northeast as cooler air moves in from the west.

Some of the hottest temperatures this weekend included 100 degrees Sunday at New York City's LaGuardia Airport, which tied a record; 99 degrees in Bridgeport, Connecticut, which broke Sunday's record; and 97 degrees Saturday in Manchester, New Hampshire, also a record.

A slow-moving frontal boundary continues to bring cooler weather to the Great Lakes and Midwest on Monday morning, where the temperature in Chicago is in the 60s -- the coolest it has felt in the last 10 days.

Strong storms are bringing heavy rain, flooding and damaging winds along this frontal boundary.

Over the weekend, hundreds of thousands of people were left without power in the Great Lakes, where winds gusted to 86 mph in Wisconsin on Saturday. There were five reported tornadoes in Wisconsin, as well.

In western Michigan, up to 13.5 inches of rain fell, which could be a state record if verified.

Flood alerts have been issued Monday morning for 10 states from Tennessee to New York due to heavy rain expected Monday afternoon and evening.

Some areas could see up to 4 inches of rain in short period of time, which could cause flash flooding.

The severe weather forecast Monday afternoon and evening in the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast includes damaging winds, hail and even a small chance for tornadoes from Washington, D.C., to New York City and into Providence, Rhode Island.

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Courtesy Paula HIll (NEW YORK) -- Paula Hill is sharing the prettiest photos of her missing daughter Shemika that she can still find.

Sitting on an old bed with a quilted top, she poured through boxes of memories. Some were of her middle child in pigtails. Others were pictures taken at high school homecoming. All of them show her daughter’s shy smile. This is the Shemika she wants America to see, someone worth fighting for, and someone she hopes the world will help her bring home.

Shemika Cosey disappeared a few days after Christmas in 2008. She was spending the night watching movies at a cousin’s house, just outside St. Louis.

“On December the 28, that was the last day that I seen her,” says Hill. “December the 28, 2008. And it was a normal day.”

Cosey was 16 years old at the time, and was in and out of the home several times that night. There was someone fighting for her attention outside. When everyone woke up in the morning, Cosey was gone.

“The door was cracked. Her coat and purse was gone. But her overnight bag was still there,” says Hill.

Police discovered an unlocked door, and decided that Cosey had run away, so they never searched for the girl, according to Hill. It is a common complaint from the families of missing black Americans -- that police are quick to say that their loved ones “ran away” and so no foot search is necessary, advocates for missing children say.

"Do I believe she left on her own with someone? Yes," says Hill. “But she was intending to come back. She was intending to come back home. She was not intending to stay gone for 10 years.”

Hill says there were signs someone had a hold on her daughter. She once saw her inside a dark sedan with a much older man. She worried her teenage girl was smoking marijuana, and says she once discovered a fake ID that her daughter was using to sneak into local nightclubs.

Hill worries her daughter is the victim of sex-trafficking.

When the police allegedly refused to search the streets, Hill and her family searched on their own, handing out flyers with her daughter’s photo.

“I need her to get away,” Hill says. “Wherever she is, when she get away, she'll be home. I miss her. I love her. I need her. The family needs her."

Shawndrea Thomas is a local television news reporter and anchor who also produces a podcast, “Intrigued Full Effect," following the stories of missing black Americans. She covers cases that are often ignored, and Shemika Cosey was one of her first.

“Shemika Cosey's story was different in that she just vanished without a trace,” says Thomas. “There was no body found ever. You know back then social media wasn't happening as much as it is now so she didn't really have a social media footprint.”

“It has been difficult to get some of these stories told as it comes to missing people of color, or cold cases involving people of color,” Thomas adds.

Cosey’s friends have been little help, according to her mother.

“I got a little information from them,” Hill says. “We tried to talk to some of her girlfriends that lived downstairs. We stayed in an apartment complex in Hazelwood, Missouri. And the girls downstairs, because they were underage, we asked the parents. And the parents said no, they didn't want to get involved.

Hill says she broke down in tears the day she and her two other children moved, and the day she was forced to change the number to her cellphone.

“Yeah, it was very hard. I was in the store crying my eyes out. The number -- the only number that she knew. And I had to get all that changed. It's like, I always wonder, like, is she going to be able to find me? If she get away, she gotta find me,” Hill says.

During her move, Hill found three notebooks with written messages her daughter had passed to a friend in class, just a few months before her daughter’s disappearance. In them, the 16-year-old talks about a boyfriend, and that she might be pregnant.

Hill has not given the notebooks to investigators.

“Why didn't they come to my house and search her room when she came up missing?” Hill says. “I mean, 'cause they didn't care. So why should I give these to them?"

Major Art Jackson, an African American officer at the Berkeley Police Department, tells us his team could use the notebooks, and cites them as an example of the strained relationship that law enforcement has with the family. But police also report that calls are now starting to come in about Shemika, after all these years.

“Two weeks ago, we got -- we got a call,” Major Jackson says. “And we're gonna follow up on any and all leads that we get.”

Hill has started a support group for families with loved ones who are missing. They warn parents who find themselves in these situations to act quickly, and to not wait for authorities. They say those first 48 hours after a loved goes missing are incredibly important.

Hill is confident her daughter will make it back home.

“She knows Mama is wondering where she is,” says Hill. “So I want my baby to know we miss you, we love you, we need you home. She is loved. And we’re waiting on her.”

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WFTS (CLEARWATER, Fla.) -- A Lightning struck at a Florida beach on Sunday, leaving eight people injured, police said.

The victims were struck at Clearwater Beach near Tampa on Sunday afternoon, according to the Clearwater Police Department.

The department said one person was hit by the strike directly and rushed to a nearby hospital in critical condition. Another person was treated for burns and three others were hospitalized as a precaution.

At least three others were injured, but refused treatment at the scene. Lightning was also blamed for at least three fires in the area on Saturday.

The Clearwater Fire and Rescue said it's common for people to stay on the beach to watch the storms pass, but it's dangerous.

"Beachgoers should take cover and go to a safe place when lightning and thunder are present. As a reminder, Clearwater Fire and Rescue uses the phrase: when you hear the roar, go indoor," the fire department told ABC affiliate WFTS-TV.

Storms moving through the Midwest following days of record heat sparked several lightning storms. The volatile weather resulted in two others being struck by lightning in Pennsylvania and Illinois on Sunday.

A 16-year-old boy was struck by lightning at a soccer tournament in Aurora, Illinois, according to Chicago ABC station WLS-TV. The boy remained conscious and was taken to a local hospital.

A boy was also struck by lightning in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, Sunday afternoon. The boy was taken to the hospital in unknown condition, according to Philadelphia ABC station WPVI-TV.

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Google Street View(NEW YORK) -- A North Carolina man died in a "freak accident" after rough waters in the ocean caused him to break his neck, according to his family.

Lee Dingle, 37, was playing in shallow waters with his children on Oak Island in North Carolina on Friday when an "intense" wave crashed over him, slamming him into the sand, his wife, Shannon Dingle, wrote on Twitter.

The swelling in his throat was so severe that it cut off oxygen to his brain, according to a GoFundMe campaign set up for the family. He leaves behind his wife and six children.

"Some heroes - including our kids - tried to save him, but it wouldn’t have mattered what they did," Shannon Dingle tweeted. "His body couldn’t recover from the initial injury."

The couple met when Lee Dingle was 19 and Shannon Dingle was 18, she wrote.

"I wasn’t supposed to be saying goodbye at 37," she posted to Twitter. "I don’t know how to be a grown up without him, but I’ll learn. I just wish I didn’t have to."

Family friend April Schweitzer described Lee Dingle as an attentive father to ABC Raleigh affiliate WTVD-TV.

"How he saw each child for who they were uniquely and just supported them in that and encouraged them and was always there for them," she said. "But I feel like anyone who knew him was a better person from their interactions with him."

The Archibald Project, the organization that documented the Dingles' adoption of one of their children, Zoe, wrote on Facebook that it is "grieved and saddened to share the tragic passing of a beautiful man and father."

Four of the Dingles' children are adopted -- three are siblings from Uganda, and Zoe, who has cerebral palsy, is from Taiwan, according to the organization, which advocates for orphans worldwide.

The Dingles first appeared on WTVD in 2016 after a local medical supply business donated a lift for Zoe's electric wheelchair.

Lee Dingle had just been promoted to partner of Atlas Engineering, where he had worked for 15 years, WTVD reported.

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iStock/Brian Sevald(NEW YORK) -- Four teenagers were hospitalized in Pennsylvania over the weekend after a gunman opened fire at graduation party.

The teens were enjoying a backyard celebration at a home in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, on Saturday when shots rang out, according to police.

Chaos ensued as the crowd of about 125 attempted to flee, the Allegheny County Police Department said. Thankfully, there were no fatalities, but the department said three teen girls and one boy were wounded.

The teens, all between the ages of 14 and 18, sustained multiple gunshot wounds, and were taken to nearby hospitals for treatment, police said. They were listed in stable condition as of Sunday evening.

The motive for the shooting remains unclear and there were no arrests made.

"When the shooting began, most of the people fled and did not return. County Police is asking anyone who was at the party to contact the department via its Tipline," the department said. "The motive for the shooting is unknown and no suspects have been identified."

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iStock/Fedorovekb(JACKSONVILLE, Fla.) --  Police in Florida are searching for a pair of teenagers who allegedly staged a fight to escape from juvenile jail over the weekend.

Authorities said four teens managed to escape from a juvenile justice facility in Jacksonville late Saturday night by staging an altercation in their dorm room and attacking staff members who tried to intervene.

The inmates -- identified as Tajah Bing, 16, Davionne Baldwin, 17, Tyjuan Monroe, 16, and Marcus Ledbetter, 17 -- then allegedly overpowered workers in the facility's control room and opened the front door, according to the Jacksonville Sheriff's Office

"[The] suspects then fought with staff in the control room and pushed buttons to release the front door," the office said in a statement. "Suspects dumped a staff member's purse onto the floor and stole her vehicle keys and took a staff issued cell phone."

The teens allegedly stole a worker's car keys, cell phone and purse, and fled in her vehicle, the office said.

It posted images of the teens and the stolen getaway vehicle -- a bronze, 4-door Infiniti Q50 with Florida license plate LANE19 -- on Twitter Sunday, asking the public to help with the search.

🔺🔺ESCAPED INMATES UPDATE #2: Located: Marcus Ledbetter. Other two/vehicle are outstanding.

Could be anywhere.

Escaped from FL Dept. of Juvenile Justice facility.

2015, bronze, Infiniti Q50 with FL tag LANE19. Actual photos attached.

Call 911 if you have info. Please RT pic.twitter.com/sVvxkMTCTB

— Jax Sheriff's Office (@JSOPIO) July 21, 2019

The sheriff's office said two of the teens, Ledbetter and Monroe, had been apprehended as of Sunday afternoon, but the others were still on the loose.

The four teens were originally being held at a Florida Department of Juvenile Justice facility on various charges.

Police are offering up to $3,000 for information leading to to the arrest of Bing and Bladwin.

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iStock(BOSTON) -- Police in Massachusetts asked a simple favor of residents who may be planning a crime over the weekend: Please wait until the heat wave is over to conduct your criminal activity.

Around 93 million people were under excessive heat warnings and advisories over the weekend, including several states in the Northeast. In Massachusetts, the heat index was slated to reach as high as 112 degrees in some places, according to ABC Boston affiliate WCVB-TV.

Multiple police departments requested that any would-be criminals spare them from having to respond during scorching temperatures.

"Due to the extreme heat, we are asking anyone thinking of doing criminal activity to hold off until Monday," the Braintree Police Department posted to Facebook. "It is straight up hot as soccer balls out there. Conducting criminal activity, in this extreme heat is next level henchmen status, and also very dangerous."

The police department suggested that people stay home, blast the air conditioning and binge-watch Season 3 of Stranger Things instead.

The Malden Police Department also took a stand against venturing outside in the sweltering heat, stating that all criminal activity has been put on hold "until further notice."

"It is going to be extremely hot over the weekend," the police department posted to Facebook. "Malden Police is advising all criminals to stay inside until further notice."

However, the department warned residents that they are still ready to uphold the law, stating that they are "staying hydrated to ensure that the great City of Malden is protected."

Temperatures are expected to drop to normal on Monday.

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(BOSTON) -- Police in Massachusetts asked a simple favor of residents who may be planning a crime over the weekend: Please wait until the heat wave is over to conduct your criminal activity.

 

 

Around 93 million people were under excessive heat warnings and advisories over the weekend, including several states in the Northeast. In Massachusetts, the heat index was slated to reach as high as 112 degrees in some places, according to ABC Boston affiliate WCVB-TV.

 

Multiple police departments requested that any would-be criminals spare them from having to respond during scorching temperatures.

 

"Due to the extreme heat, we are asking anyone thinking of doing criminal activity to hold off until Monday," the Braintree Police Department posted to Facebook. "It is straight up hot as soccer balls out there. Conducting criminal activity, in this extreme heat is next level henchmen status, and also very dangerous."

 

The police department suggested that people stay home, blast the air conditioning and binge-watch Season 3 of Stranger Things instead.

 

The Malden Police Department also took a stand against venturing outside in the sweltering heat, stating that all criminal activity has been put on hold "until further notice."

 

"It is going to be extremely hot over the weekend," the police department posted to Facebook. "Malden Police is advising all criminals to stay inside until further notice."

 

However, the department warned residents that they are still ready to uphold the law, stating that they are "staying hydrated to ensure that the great City of Malden is protected."

 

Temperatures are expected to drop to normal on Monday.

 

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ABC News(NEW YORK) -- Ninety-four million people in parts of 23 states remain under excessive heat warnings and heat advisories on Sunday as one last day of scorching temperatures hits the Midwest and East Coast.

Sunday is the last day of oppressive heat, with many places in the Upper Midwest already feeling cooler Sunday morning after heat indices of 115 to 120 on Friday and Saturday. That seasonably cool air will make its way east this week.

JFK International Airport and Atlantic City, New Jersey, both set daily record highs at 99 degrees Saturday, but most records being set are for the warm overnight temperatures. New York City and Boston are just two of many cities that set or tied record-high minimum temperatures, with temperatures failing to drop below 80 degrees.

Heat indices far surpassed the triple-digit mark across the eastern U.S. on Saturday:

- Hartford, Connecticut: 110 degrees; actual high 95

- Washington, D.C.: 108 degrees; actual high 97

- Kansas City, Missouri: 109 degrees; actual high 98

- Baltimore: 107 degrees; actual high 100

- Boston: 107 degrees; actual high 97

- Chicago: 107 degrees; actual high 95

Heat index values continued to feel higher than 90 degrees overnight from Norfolk, Virginia, to Boston.

The excessive heat warnings remain in effect for Sunday, with heat indices reaching 110 degrees.

Actual temperatures will stay in the 90s for most of the East Coast -- often in the upper reaches.

Boston has another chance of hitting 99 on Sunday -- the hottest temperature since 2013.

Washington, D.C., could also hit 100 degrees for the first time since 2016.

The relief is finally making its way east, though.

It’s already significantly cooler across the Great Lakes and Midwest.

Chicago; Minneapolis; Des Moines, Iowa; and Detroit felt like 105 to 119 degrees. The high temperatures Sunday are in the 70s and low 80s.

Those temperatures will reach the East Coast early this week, and there will be a nice break from the heat and humidity with below-average temperatures.

More severe weather possible

Several rounds of severe storms across the Midwest and Great Lakes have knocked out power to hundreds of thousands and caused widespread damage. There were over 430,000 customers without power Sunday morning across Wisconsin and Michigan.

There were more than 240 storm reports just from Saturday, and more than 450 storm reports between Friday and Saturday.

Winds gusted 70 to 80 mph and brought down numerous tree limbs, and thousands of power lines from South Dakota to Minnesota, and in Wisconsin and Michigan.

The severe weather will be focused around Missouri and Kansas again on Sunday. The main threat again is damaging winds, along with hail and also an isolated tornado.

Storms will be scattered from Missouri to Pennsylvania, but have the potential to be severe at times with damaging winds.

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WTAE-TV(FARMINGTON, Penn.) -- An employee at a wildlife resort in Pennsylvania was attacked by a bear on Saturday.

The guide at Nemacolin Woodlands Resort in Farmington, Pennsylvania, about 60 miles south of Pittsburgh, was grabbed through a fence by a Himalayan bear, pulled toward it and bit on the arm, according to the resort.

The female employee was flown by helicopter to a local hospital, but is "stable and alert," Nemacolin Woodlands Resort said.

"We deeply regret this incident," Maggie Hardy Knox, president of Nemacolin Woodlands Resort, said in a statement. "Our thoughts are with our injured associate, our staff and guests as we focus on ensuring they receive the finest medical attention and counseling."

The resort said it would provide counseling to guests and staff who witnessed the attack.

The bear has been at the wildlife reserve for nine years, it said.

The organization advertises one-hour tours where you can feed various livestock before viewing wolves, tigers, lions and buffalo. "Don’t forget the bear enclosure, where we hear the bears enjoy eating marshmallows," the adventure advertises.

The bear has not been put down, the Pennsylvania Game Commission said.

There are two different types of Himalayan bears, both black and brown bears, but the resort did not specify which attacked the staff member. Both are large bears, standing over 5 feet tall and weighing in excess of 200 pounds.

The bears' natural habitat is in the Himalayan Mountains, as their name suggests, from northern Afghanistan through Pakistan and into northern India, Nepal and western China.

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iStock(OXNARD, Calif.) -- The mother of a newborn and her boyfriend have been arrested after the disturbing murder of the baby soon after she gave birth at a California hospital.

Andrea Torralba, 20, and David Villa, 21, both of Oxnard, California, about 60 miles northwest of Los Angeles, were taken into custody on Friday afternoon after police responded to St. John’s Medical Center.

After responding to the hospital, officers from the Oxnard Police Department "learned that a newborn infant was in critical condition with suspicious injuries," according to the department.

Detectives from Oxnard police's Family Protection Unit said their investigation led them to believe Torralba and Villa strangled the baby until he was unconscious just hours after she gave birth.

Hospital personnel immediately started lifesaving procedures, but the male child was pronounced dead.

Oxnard police Sgt. Brandon Ordelheide told Los Angeles ABC station KABC-TV the couple admitted under questioning that they did not want the child.

Both have been charged with assault on a child by means of force resulting in the child’s death, police said. The felony is punishable by a sentence of 25 years to life in prison.

Villa is being held at Ventura County's Main Jail on $5 million bail. He is next scheduled to appear in Ventura County Superior Court on Tuesday.

Torralba is being held on $1 million bail, police said.

Authorities said an investigation into the death is still ongoing.

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WJTN News Headlines for July 22, 2019

The investigation is continuing into the cause of an early morning blaze Sunday that extensively damaged a two-story single family home in Jamestown....   City Fire Battlion Chief Chris Dahlgr...

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