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(WASHINGTON) --  Special counsel Robert Mueller's report into the Kremlin's interference in the 2016 presidential election did not find that the Trump campaign or anyone associated with it conspired or coordinated with Russia, according to a letter to Congress from Attorney General William Barr.

The letter describes "two main" Russian efforts to influence the election including “attempts by a Russian organization… to conduct disinformation and social media operations in the United States” and “the Russian government’s efforts to conduct computer hacking operations” targeting former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign and the Democratic Party.

In both circumstances, the “Special Counsel did not find that the Trump campaign, or anyone associated with it, conspired or coordinated with the Russian government in these efforts.”

The special counsel’s office made no conclusion on the matter of possible obstruction of justice by President Donald Trump.

"The Special Counsel therefore did not draw a conclusion – one way or the other – as to whether the examined conduct constituted obstruction," the letter read. "Instead, for each of the relevant actions investigated, the report sets out 'difficult issues' of law and fact concerning whether the President's actions and intent could be viewed as obstruction."

In his communique to lawmakers, Barr underscored that the special counsel states that “while this report does not conclude that the president committed a crime, it also does not exonerate him.”

While Mueller’s report did not reach a conclusion as to whether obstruction of justice occurred, Attorney General Barr’s letter said he determined a case for obstruction was not warranted.

“In cataloging the President’s actions many of which took place in public view, the report identities no actions that, in our judgment, constitute obstructive conduct, had a nexus to a pending or contemplated proceeding, and were done with corrupt intent, each of which, under the Department's principles of federal prosecution guiding charging decisions, would need to be proven beyond a reasonable doubt to establish an obstruction-of-justice offense."

Barr said his intent is to release as much as possible but there are grand jury secrecy concerns with some portions.

The White House celebrated the news, with President Donald Trump hailing the report on Twitter and, later in comments to reporters, as an "exoneration."

"This was an illegal takedown that failed and hopefully, someone is going to be looking at the other side," Trump told reporters on Sunday.

He tweeted: "No Collusion, No Obstruction, Complete and Total EXONERATION. KEEP AMERICA GREAT!"

No Collusion, No Obstruction, Complete and Total EXONERATION. KEEP AMERICA GREAT!

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) March 24, 2019

"The Special Counsel did not find any collusion and did not find any obstruction," White House press secretary Sarah Sanders said in a statement. "Attorney General Barr and Deputy Attorney General Rosenstein further determined there was no obstruction. The findings of the Department of Justice are a total and complete exoneration of the President of the United States.”

Jay Sekulow, one of President Trump’s lawyers, told ABC News chief anchor George Stephanopoulos that the report was a "complete win for the president and the American people."

"Not just a win." Sekulow said. "The entire basis upon which this inquiry was instituted was a concern over collusion between the Russian government and the trump campaign, Bob Mueller and the Department of Justice could not be clearer. To have the obstruction issue even as a viable one, which it was not, there would have to be an underlying crime, which there wasn't."

House Judiciary Chairman Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., questioned the timing of the letter tweeting "Special Counsel Mueller worked for 22 months to determine the extent to which President Trump obstructed justice. Attorney General Barr took 2 days to tell the American people that while the President is not exonerated, there will be no action by DOJ."

The news comes amid Democrats continued calls for the full release of the findings.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, in a joint letter, seemed to sum up the sentiment of many congressional Democrats in saying that Barr's letter "raises as many questions as it answers" and that Congress "requires the full report and the underlying documents."

"The fact that Special Counsel Mueller’s report does not exonerate the president on a charge as serious as obstruction of justice demonstrates how urgent it is that the full report and underlying documentation be made public without any further delay," they wrote. "Given Mr. Barr’s public record of bias against the Special Counsel’s inquiry, he is not a neutral observer and is not in a position to make objective determinations about the report."

The congressional leaders also took issues with the president's claims of being "exonerated."

On the campaign trail and on the Hill, Democrats made clear they are going to want every detail and document about the investigation and some have said they are willing to use their subpoena power in order to get it.

"It means make the request, if the request is denied subpoena, if the subpoenas are denied we will hold people before the Congress and yes, we will prosecute in court as necessary to get this information," House Intelligence Committee chairman Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., said Sunday on "This Week".

Democratic candidates running to unseat President Donald Trump in 2020 reacted quickly to the news that Mueller delivered his report to DOJ with one consistent message: Make it public.

"The Mueller report must be made public — all of it," Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-NY said in a presidential campaign speech outside the Trump International Hotel and Tower in New York City.

"The Mueller report must be made public — all of it," Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand says in 2020 speech.

"it is not often that I agree with Richard Nixon, but he was right to say that the American people have a right to know whether their president is a crook" https://t.co/rTYLWyQTQg pic.twitter.com/bsJxzCYQIN

— ABC News Politics (@ABCPolitics) March 24, 2019

She added: "It is not often that I agree with Richard Nixon, but he was right to say that the American people have a right to know whether their president is a crook."

The much-awaited report was handed to the Justice Department for Barr’s review, and Congress was notified of the transfer late Friday afternoon, according to a Justice Department spokeswoman.

After reviewing Mueller's report, Barr will then send what he has described as his own "report" on the Mueller investigation to the top Democrats and Republicans on the House and Senate Judiciary committees. Barr has promised to be as transparent as possible, but it's unclear how extensive or detailed Barr's own "report" to Congress will be.

In a letter to the leaders of the House and Senate Judiciary committees, Barr wrote that he is reviewing the report and anticipates that he "may be in a position to advise you of the Special Counsel's principal conclusions as soon as this weekend." He continued that, separately, he intends to "consult with Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein and Special Counsel Mueller to determine what other information from the report can be released to Congress and the public consistent with the law."

"The next steps are up to Attorney General Barr, and we look forward to the process taking its course. The White House has not received or been briefed on the Special Counsel’s report," White House press secretary Sarah Sanders tweeted on Friday afternoon.

A senior Department of Justice official told ABC News on Friday that the report will not include any further indictments.

Mueller and his team investigated how far the Kremlin went to interfere in the 2016 presidential election, including trying to determine whether any Americans may have helped those efforts.

At the heart of Mueller’s probe were two Russian operations: the spread of disinformation on social media, and the release of thousands of sensitive emails stolen by hackers from the Democratic National Committee and other Democratic targets. Mueller’s team has charged 25 Russian nationals and three foreign companies for their alleged role in those operations.

In appointing a special counsel to investigate, however, Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein also directed Mueller to look into “allegations” of possible “coordination” between Russian operatives and associates of President Donald Trump.

Trump and his Republican allies have derided the investigation as a “witch hunt.” But Rosenstein, FBI Director Chris Wray and Barr have each explicitly disputed that description.

At least four Trump associates, including Trump’s former national security adviser Michael Flynn, have pleaded guilty to lying to federal agents during the Russia-related investigation.

Another Trump associate, the president’s former attorney Michael Cohen, has pleaded guilty to lying to Congress about Trump’s business dealings in Moscow. And former Trump adviser Roger Stone has been charged with lying to Congress about his alleged role in tracking information stolen from Democrats during the 2016 presidential campaign.

Mueller’s investigation grew out of a probe the FBI launched in late July 2016.

By then, the FBI was already scrutinizing Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort’s business dealings with pro-Russian officials in Ukraine – dealings that have since landed Manafort in jail. And the FBI was keeping tabs on Trump adviser Carter Page, who was previously targeted for recruitment by Russian spies and had raised eyebrows with a trip to Moscow in mid-July 2016.

But claims by Trump adviser George Papadopoulos – that the Russians were touting “dirt” on Clinton – really set off alarms inside the FBI.

“If any Americans were part of helping the Russians [attack] us, that is a very big deal,” James Comey, who was FBI director at the time, later told lawmakers.

Several weeks after formally launching the Russia probe, counterintelligence agents leading the investigation in Washington received a so-called “dossier,” which had been compiled at the behest of Democrats and detailed uncorroborated allegations of coordination between Trump’s campaign and the Kremlin.

Some of the allegations involved Page, who was already on the FBI’s radar, so agents began secretly intercepting his communications. Page has never been charged with any crimes.

The wide-ranging investigation continued even after Trump took office. After Jeff Sessions became attorney general, he recused himself from oversight of the FBI’s Russia-related probe, citing his previous advocacy for Trump on the campaign trail.

Rosenstein subsequently assumed oversight of the investigation.

And then Trump shocked the federal law enforcement community: He fired Comey.

The move prompted Rosenstein to appoint Mueller to take over the whole matter, including a review of whether Comey's firing and other actions meant Trump improperly tried to obstruct the probe.

Comey later alleged that in a private meeting with Trump before his removal, the president directed Comey to “let [Flynn] go.”

Mueller has not released any evidence suggesting Trump committed a crime related to Russian efforts.

However, Mueller did uncover evidence of other possible crimes and referred those cases to other federal prosecutors.

The U.S. Attorney’s Office in Manhattan ended up tying Trump to federal campaign violations, alleging that – in the midst of the 2016 presidential campaign – Trump personally directed Cohen to silence two woman claiming affairs with Trump by making illegal payments to them; Trump has repeatedly denied the affairs.

Cohen has pleaded guilty for his role in the matter, but no other charges have been filed.

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Ethan Miller/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- Democratic candidates running to unseat President Donald Trump in 2020 reacted quickly to the news Friday that special counsel Robert Mueller had delivered his highly anticipated report to the Department of Justice.

Their one consistent message: Make it public.

Sens. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., Cory Booker, D-N.J., Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., and Kamala Harris, D-Calif., and former Texas Rep. Beto O'Rourke, all called for the report -- the product of nearly two years of investigation -- to be released immediately to the American people.

"The Mueller report must be made public. All of it," Gillibrand said at her 2020 campaign kickoff event in front of Trump International Hotel in New York. "It's not often that I agree with Richard Nixon. But he was right to say that the American people have a right to know whether their president is a crook."

"The Mueller report must be made public — all of it," Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand says in 2020 speech.

"it is not often that I agree with Richard Nixon, but he was right to say that the American people have a right to know whether their president is a crook" https://t.co/rTYLWyQTQg pic.twitter.com/bsJxzCYQIN

— ABC News Politics (@ABCPolitics) March 24, 2019

"This report should be made public immediately," Booker tweeted from his campaign account. A longer reaction from Booker was tweeted from his official Senate account: "I am demanding the Mueller report be made immediately available for members of Congress and for the public. Anything short of full transparency will be detrimental to our country moving forward. The American people deserve the truth."

"This report should be made public immediately," Booker tweeted from his campaign account. A longer reaction from Booker was tweeted from his official Senate account: "I am demanding the Mueller report be made immediately available for members of Congress and for the public. Anything short of full transparency will be detrimental to our country moving forward. The American people deserve the truth."

I am demanding the Mueller report be made immediately available for members of Congress and for the public. Anything short of full transparency will be detrimental to our country moving forward.

The American people deserve the truth. https://t.co/gyNDlHgZNY

— Sen. Cory Booker (@SenBooker) March 22, 2019

"As Donald Trump said, “Let it come out." I call on the Trump administration to make Special Counsel Mueller's full report public as soon as possible. No one, including the president, is above the law," Sanders tweeted.

As Donald Trump said, “Let it come out." I call on the Trump administration to make Special Counsel Mueller's full report public as soon as possible. No one, including the president, is above the law.

— Bernie Sanders (@BernieSanders) March 22, 2019

"Americans deserve to know the truth now that the Mueller report is complete. The report must be released immediately and AG Barr must publicly testify under oath about the investigation's findings. We need total transparency here," Harris tweeted.

Americans deserve to know the truth now that the Mueller report is complete. The report must be released immediately and AG Barr must publicly testify under oath about the investigation's findings. We need total transparency here.

— Kamala Harris (@KamalaHarris) March 22, 2019

 "Attorney General Barr must release the full report to the public," Klobuchar tweeted. "The American people deserve to know the facts."

BREAKING: The Mueller report is complete. Attorney General Barr must release the full report to the public. The American people deserve to know the facts. https://t.co/XdUaSw31Xu

— Amy Klobuchar (@amyklobuchar) March 22, 2019

"Attorney General Barr—release the Mueller report to the American public. Now," Warren tweeted.

I don’t take PAC money or checks from federal lobbyists. This grassroots movement is by the people, for the people—and it’s going to take all of us fighting side by side to win in #2020. Let’s do this together. https://t.co/04aDwnif8a

— Elizabeth Warren (@ewarren) March 21, 2019

"Release the Mueller report to the American people," O'Rourke tweeted.

Other 2020 Democratic hopefuls who joined the chorus of calls for the report to be made public included former Washington Gov. Jay Inslee, Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro and former Maryland Rep. John Delaney.

“The American public deserves to know the contents of the Mueller Report. Donald Trump and his Attorney General cannot be trusted to summarize or excerpt it accurately,” Inslee tweeted.

The American public deserves to know the contents of the Mueller Report. Donald Trump and his Attorney General cannot be trusted to summarize or excerpt it accurately.

— Jay Inslee (@JayInslee) March 22, 2019

"The American people deserve to know the full truth about Russia’s interference in our democracy," Castro wrote in a tweet. "The Special Counsel report must be publicly released in its entirety."

"The patriotic action for the Attorney General is to release the entire Mueller Report to the American people. We paid for it and this moment requires transparency," Delaney said in a tweet.

“Make the full Mueller report public and available to the American people,” Gabbard tweeted.

Make the full Mueller report public and available to the American people. #ReleaseTheReport

— Tulsi Gabbard (@TulsiGabbard) March 23, 2019

The delivery of the report signaled the completion of Mueller's investigation into how far the Kremlin went to interfere in the 2016 presidential election, including whether anyone with the Trump campaign may have helped those efforts.

The Mueller investigation has been looming over the White House for almost two years of Trump's presidency. As he mounts his re-election bid, the Democratic field appeared to show caution about attacking the president but were united in their calls for transparency.

The first potential Republican primary challenger, former Massachusetts Gov. Bill Weld, said the process should play out "without interference."

"It's about Rule of Law. Important for this process to play out without interference," Weld said in a tweet.

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Kena Betancur/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand gave her first major speech as a Democratic presidential candidate on Sunday in front of the Trump International Hotel and Tower in New York City, describing herself up as a courageous politician willing to take on difficult fights.

“The people of this country deserve a president worthy of your bravery…your bravery is what inspires me every day. That’s is why I’m running for president of the United States,” Gillibrand told a crowd of supporters.

Gillibrand became the latest in a crowded field of Democratic presidential candidates when she announced her candidacy last Sunday.

Speaking in front of the Trump Tower on Columbus Circle, a building she called “a shrine to breed division and vanity,” Gillibrand called the president “a coward” and attacked several of his policies including family separation at the border, the travel ban on people from majority-Muslim countries, and his ambition to build a wall along the U.S. border.

The senator added she was proud to “have stood up against Donald Trump more than anyone in the Senate,” and touted her ability to go “toe to toe” with Trump.

As the country awaits details from Robert Mueller’s investigation, Gillibrand said “the report must be made public. All of it.”

The Democrat even crossed party lines to agree with a former Republican president, saying “I don’t often agree with Richard Nixon, but he was right to say the American people have a right to know whether or not the president is a crook.”

Like other progressives in the crowded field, Gillibrand touted her support for the Green New Deal, “Medicare for All,” universal pre-k, bail reform, and a $15 minimum wage. She acknowledged that none of these fights will be easy, saying “but I’ve never backed down from a fight for what’s right, and I’m not about to start now. That is why I’m running president.”

Gillibrand also said that the U.S. should “aspire to net zero carbon emissions in the next 10 years.”

The senator will spend the night in New York after meeting with her campaign staff at their headquarters in Troy, New York, and "have a celebration dinner" before heading back to Washington D.C. on Monday.

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Alex Wong/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) --  Over the course of his nearly two-year-long probe, special counsel Robert Mueller and his team of prosecutors have now indicted 34 individuals and three Russian businesses on charges ranging from computer hacking to conspiracy and financial crimes.

Those indictments have led to seven guilty pleas and four people sentenced to prison.

Here's what you need to know.  

Paul Manafort

Former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort faced charges in two separate federal courts on a slew of financial crime charges related largely to his lobbying work in Ukraine.

A jury found Manafort guilty on eight of 18 counts he was tried within the Eastern District of Virginia, with the judge declaring a mistrial on the other ten. The guilty charges included multiple counts of false income tax returns, failure to file reports of foreign bank accounts, and bank fraud.

Manafort was charged with an additional seven counts in the District of Columbia and pleaded guilty to conspiracy against the United States and to witness tampering in the D.C. case. As part of the plea agreement, Manafort also admitted his guilt on the remaining counts in his Virginia trial.

Rick Gates

Rick Gates, a former Trump campaign official and longtime business associate of Paul Manafort, was charged in two separate federal courts in connection to financial crimes, unregistered foreign lobbying and on allegations that he made false statements to federal prosecutors. Gates pleaded guilty in Washington, D.C. in February 2018 on counts of conspiracy against the United States and lying to federal prosecutors. As part of his plea agreement, he avoided a slew of financial charges in the Eastern District of Virginia that included assisting in the preparation of false income taxes, bank fraud, bank fraud conspiracy and false income taxes. His charges are intimately tied to those of Manafort. In the Eastern District of Virginia, the two were indicted jointly.

Konstantin Kilimnik

The special counsel issued three separate indictments against Manafort. In the third, prosecutors implicated Kilimnik for the first time, charging him with conspiracy to obstruct justice and obstruction of justice. These charges concern communications between Manafort and Kilimnik regarding messages they exchanged with two journalists who were potential witnesses in the case against them. Though Kilimnik has been indicted, he remains outside of the reach of U.S. law enforcement.

Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn

In his dramatic and surprise guilty plea in U.S. District Court on Dec. 1, 2017, early in Mueller's investigation, Army Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn acknowledged that his false statements and omissions in FBI interviews a few days after Trump was sworn in "impeded and otherwise had a material impact on the FBI’s ongoing investigation into the existence of any links or coordination between individuals associated with the campaign and Russian efforts to interfere with the 2016 presidential election," which the statement of offense he agreed to said.

He specifically admitted to lying about asking the Russian ambassador to refrain from responding to Obama administration sanctions against Russia for its election interference and further requested Russia help block a United Nations vote on Israeli settlements which the incoming administration didn't agree with. Flynn also agreed that he lied about his lobbying activities in federal filings related to work on behalf of the Republic of Turkey throughout the 2016 campaign.

Roger Stone

The seven counts against President Donald Trump's longtime friend and veteran political operative Roger Stone include one count of obstruction of an official proceeding, five counts of false statements -- including lying to Congress -- and one count of witness tampering in special counsel Robert Mueller’s probe into possible collusion between Russia and the Trump campaign during the 2016 presidential election.

The charges brought by Mueller's office largely revolve around false statements Stone is accused of making to the House Intelligence Committee regarding his communications with associates about Wikileaks. He also stands accused of witness tampering in connection with humorist and radio show host Randy Credico's testimony to the House Intelligence Committee. In Stone's 24-page indictment, Mueller painted perhaps the clearest picture yet of possible collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia.

Michael Cohen

Michael Cohen, President Donald J. Trump’s former personal attorney and long-time fixer, pleaded guilty to one count of making false statements to Congress, a crime punishable by up to five years in prison and a maximum fine of $250,000. In December, a federal judge in New York sentenced Cohen to three months in prison on the false statements charge to be served concurrently with a three-year sentence he received for other crimes committed in the Southern District of New York. He is due to report to prison by March 6.

Rick Gates

Long before Russian hackers purportedly stole emails from the Democratic National Committee, other Russians were already attempting to interfere with the U.S. political system and American society through a widespread online influence campaign, according to special counsel Robert Mueller. The influence operation started as far back as 2014, was well-funded in part by a reported associate of Russian president Vladimir Putin, and took advantage of the already divisive political landscape to try to turn Americans against one another, an indictment filed by the special counsel says.

The Russian Intrusion

On July 13, 2018 special counsel Robert Mueller took direct aim at the Russians who allegedly were personally responsible for infiltrating the Democratic National Committee’s computer system, among others, setting in motion what former intelligence officers call one of the most effective active measures campaigns in history. The defendants are charged with Conspiracy to Commit an Offense Against the United States, Aggravated Identity Theft and Conspiracy to Launder Money.

George Papadopoulos

George Papadopoulos, the novice, unpaid foreign policy adviser to Donald Trump was secretly arrested for lying to FBI investigators about his correspondence with foreign nationals with close ties to senior Russian government officials. His indictment was revealed to the public after he pleaded guilty in October 2017. In September 2018, Papadopoulos was sentenced to 14 days incarceration, 200 hours of community service and a $9,500 fine

Alex van der Zwaan

In April 2018, Dutch national Alex van der Zwaan became the first person sentenced in special counsel Robert Meuller's Russia investigation in federal court in Washington. Earlier that year, he had pleaded guilty to lying to federal agents about his contacts with Trump campaign deputy chair Rick Gates in September 2016

Richard Pinedo

Richard Pinedo might be one of the lesser-known figures caught up in special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation but the California man played an instrumental role in a Russian troll factory's online influence campaign during the 2016 election by unwittingly selling bank accounts to Russians. In February 2018, Pinedo pleaded guilty to one count of identity fraud and in October that year was sentenced to serve six months in prison, followed by six months of home confinement and 100 hours of community service.

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Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- This is the letter sent to Congress from Attorney General William Barr summarizing Robert Mueller's report.

Dear Chairman Graham, Chairman Nadler, Ranking Member Feinstein, and Ranking Member Collins:

As a supplement to the notification provided on Friday, March 22, 2019, I am writing today to advise you of the principal conclusions reached by Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller III and to inform you about the status of my initial review of the report he has prepared.

The Special Counsel's Report

On Friday, the Special Counsel submitted to me a "confidential report explaining the prosecution or declination decisions" he has reached, as required by 28 C.F.R. § 600.8(c). This report is entitled "Report on the Investigation into Russian Interference in the 2016 Presidential Election." Although my review is ongoing, I believe that it is in the public interest to describe the report and to summarize the principal conclusions reached by the Special Counsel and the results of his investigation.

The report explains that the· Special Counsel and his staff thoroughly investigated allegations that members of the presidential campaign of Donald J. Trump, and others associated with it, conspired with the Russian government in its efforts to interfere in the 2016 U.S. presidential election, or sought to obstruct the related federal investigations. In the report, the Special Counsel noted that, in completing his investigation, he employed 19 lawyers who were assisted by a team of approximately 40 FBI agents, intelligence analysts, forensic accountants, and other professional staff. The Special Counsel issued more than 2,800 subpoenas, executed nearly 500 search warrants, obtained more than 230 orders for communication records, issued almost 50 orders authorizing use of pen registers, made 13 requests to foreign governments for evidence, and interviewed approximately 500 witnesses.

The Special Counsel obtained a number of indictments and convictions of individuals and entities in connection with his investigation, all of which have been publicly disclosed. During the course of his investigation, the Special Counsel also referred several matters to other offices for further action. The report does not recommend any further indictments, nor did the Special Counsel obtain any sealed indictments that have yet to be made public. Below, I summarize the principal conclusions set out in the Special Counsel's report.

Russian Interference in the 2016 U.S. Presidential Election. The Special Counsel's report is divided into two parts. The first describes the results of the Special Counsel's investigation into Russia's interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election. The report outlines the Russian effort to influence the election and documents crimes committed by persons associated with the Russian government in connection with those efforts. The report further explains that a primary consideration for the Special Counsel's investigation was whether any Americans -including individuals associated with the Trump campaign - joined the Russian conspiracies to influence the election, which would be a federal crime. The Special Counsel's investigation did not find that the Trump campaign or anyone associated with it conspired or coordinated with Russia in its efforts to influence the 2016 U.S. presidential election. As the report states: "[T]he investigation did not establish that members of the Trump Campaign conspired or coordinated with the Russian government in its election interference activities."

[Footnote from letter: In assessing potential conspiracy charges, the Special Counsel also considered whether members of the Trump campaign "coordinated" with Russian election interference activities. The Special Counsel defined "coordination" as an "agreement-tacit or express-between the Trump Campaign and the Russian government on election interference."]

The Special Counsel's investigation determined that there were two main Russian efforts to influence the 2016 election. The first involved attempts by a Russian organization, the Internet Research Agency (IRA), to conduct disinformation and social media operations in the United States designed to sow social discord, eventually with the aim of interfering with the election. As noted above, the Special Counsel did not find that any U.S. person or Trump campaign official or associate conspired or knowingly coordinated with the IRA in its efforts, although the Special Counsel brought criminal charges against a number of Russian nationals and entities in connection with these activities.

The second element involved the Russian government's efforts to conduct computer hacking operations designed to gather and disseminate information to influence the election. The Special Counsel found that Russian government actors successfully hacked into computers and obtained emails from persons affiliated with the Clinton campaign and Democratic Party organizations, and publicly disseminated those materials through various intermediaries, including WikiLeaks. Based on these activities, the Special Counsel brought criminal charges against a number of Russian military officers for conspiring to hack into computers in the United States for purposes of influencing the election. But as noted above, the Special Counsel did not find that the Trump campaign, or anyone associated with it, conspired or coordinated with the Russian government in these efforts, despite multiple. offers from Russian-affiliated individuals to assist the Trump campaign.

Obstruction of Justice. The report's second part addresses a number of actions by the President - most of which have been the subject of public reporting - that the Special Counsel investigated as potentially raising obstruction-of-justice concerns. After making a "thorough factual investigation" into these matters, the Special Counsel considered whether to evaluate the conduct under Department standards governing prosecution and declination decisions but ultimately determined not to make a traditional prosecutorial judgment. The Special Counsel therefore did not draw a conclusion - one way or the other - as to whether the examined conduct constituted obstruction. Instead, for each of the relevant actions investigated, the report sets out evidence on both sides of the question and leaves unresolved what the Special Counsel views as "difficult issues" of law and fact concerning whether the President's actions and intent could be viewed as obstruction .. The Special Counsel states that "while this report does not conclude that the President committed a crime, it also does not exonerate him."

The Special Counsel's decision to describe the facts of his obstruction investigation without reaching any legal conclusions leaves itto the Attorney General to determine whether the conduct described in the report constitutes a crime. Over the course of the investigation, the Special Counsel's office engaged in discussions with certain Department officials regarding many of the legal and factual matters at issue in the Special Counsel's obstruction investigation. After reviewing the Special Counsel's final report on these issues; consulting with Department officials, including the Office of Legal Counsel; and applying the principles of federal prosecution that guide our charging decisions, Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein and I have concluded that the evidence developed during the Special Counsel's investigation is not sufficient to establish that the President committed an obstruction-of-justice offense. Our determination was made without regard to, and is not based on, the constitutional considerations that surround the indictment and criminal prosecution of a sitting president.

[Footnote from letter: See A Sitting President's Amenability to Indictment and Criminal Prosecution, 24 Op. O.L.C. 222 (2000).]

In making this determination, we noted that the Special Counsel recognized that "the evidence does not establish that the President was involved in an underlying crime related to Russian election interference," and that, while not determinative, the absence of such evidence bears upon the President's intent with respect to obstruction. Generally speaking, to obtain and sustain an obstruction conviction, the government would need to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that a person, acting with corrupt intent, engaged in obstructive conduct with a sufficient nexus to a pending or contemplated proceeding. In cataloguing the President's actions, many of which took place in public view, the report identifies no actions that, in our judgment, constitute obstructive conduct, had a nexus to a pending or contemplated proceeding, and were done with corrupt intent, each of which, under the Department's principles of federal prosecution guiding charging decisions, would need to be proven beyond a reasonable doubt to establish an obstruction-of¬justice offense.

37,040-41 (July 9, 1999). As I have previously stated, however, I am mindful of the public interest in this matter. For that reason, my goal and intent is to release as much of the Special Counsel's report as I can consistent with applicable law, regulations, and Departmental policies.

Based on my discussions with the Special Counsel and my initial review, it is apparent that the report contains material that is or could be subject to Federal Rule of Criminal Procedure 6( e ), which imposes restrictions on the use and disclosure of information relating to "matter[ s] occurring before [a] grand jury." Fed. R. Crim. P. 6(e)(2)(B). Rule 6(e) generally limits disclosure of certain grand jury information in a criminal investigation and prosecution. Id. Disclosure of 6( e) material beyond the strict limits set forth in the rule is a crime in certain circumstances. See, e.g., 18 U.S.C. § 401(3). This restriction protects the integrity of grand jury proceedings and ensures that the unique and invaluable investigative powers of a grand jury are used strictly for their intended criminal justice function. Given these restrictions, the schedule for processing the report depends in part on how quickly the Department can identify the 6( e) material that by law cannot be made public. I have requested the assistance of the Special Counsel in identifying all 6( e) information contained in the report as quickly as possible. Separately, I also must identify any information that could impact other ongoing matters, including those that the Special Counsel has referred to other offices. As soon as that process is complete, I will be in a position to move forward expeditiously in determining what can be released in light of applicable law, regulations, and Departmental policies.

As I observed in my initial notification, the Special Counsel regulations provide that "the Attorney General may determine that public release of' notifications to your respective Committees "would be in the public interest." 28 C.F.R. § 600.9(c). I have so determined, and I will disclose this letter to the public after delivering it to you.

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Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- Amid the anticipation of Attorney General William Barr's expected release of special counsel Robert Mueller's report into the Kremlin's interference in the 2016 presidential election, Democrats continued calls for the full release of the findings.

On the campaign trail and on the Hill, Democrats made clear they are going to want every detail and document about the investigation and some have said they are willing to use their subpoena power in order to get it.

"It means make the request, if the request is denied subpoena, if the subpoenas are denied we will hold people before the Congress and yes, we will prosecute in court as necessary to get this information," House Intelligence Committee chairman Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., said Sunday on "This Week".

Democratic candidates running to unseat President Donald Trump in 2020 reacted quickly to the news that Mueller delivered his report to DOJ with one consistent message: Make it public.

"The Mueller report must be made public — all of it," Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-NY said in a presidential campaign speech outside the Trump International Hotel and Tower in New York City.

"The Mueller report must be made public — all of it," Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand says in 2020 speech.

"it is not often that I agree with Richard Nixon, but he was right to say that the American people have a right to know whether their president is a crook" https://t.co/rTYLWyQTQg pic.twitter.com/bsJxzCYQIN

— ABC News Politics (@ABCPolitics) March 24, 2019

She added: "It is not often that I agree with Richard Nixon, but he was right to say that the American people have a right to know whether their president is a crook."

The much-awaited report was handed to the Justice Department for Barr’s review, and Congress was notified of the transfer late Friday afternoon, according to a Justice Department spokeswoman.

After reviewing Mueller's report, Barr will then send what he has described as his own "report" on the Mueller investigation to the top Democrats and Republicans on the House and Senate Judiciary committees. Barr has promised to be as transparent as possible, but it's unclear how extensive or detailed Barr's own "report" to Congress will be.

 In a letter to the leaders of the House and Senate Judiciary committees, Barr wrote that he is reviewing the report and anticipates that he "may be in a position to advise you of the Special Counsel's principal conclusions as soon as this weekend." He continued that, separately, he intends to "consult with Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein and Special Counsel Mueller to determine what other information from the report can be released to Congress and the public consistent with the law."

"The next steps are up to Attorney General Barr, and we look forward to the process taking its course. The White House has not received or been briefed on the Special Counsel’s report," White House press secretary Sarah Sanders tweeted on Friday afternoon.

A senior Department of Justice official told ABC News on Friday that the report will not include any further indictments.

Mueller and his team investigated how far the Kremlin went to interfere in the 2016 presidential election, including trying to determine whether any Americans may have helped those efforts.

At the heart of Mueller’s probe were two Russian operations: the spread of disinformation on social media, and the release of thousands of sensitive emails stolen by hackers from the Democratic National Committee and other Democratic targets. Mueller’s team has charged 25 Russian nationals and three foreign companies for their alleged role in those operations.

In appointing a special counsel to investigate, however, Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein also directed Mueller to look into “allegations” of possible “coordination” between Russian operatives and associates of President Donald Trump.

Trump and his Republican allies have derided the investigation as a “witch hunt.” But Rosenstein, FBI Director Chris Wray and Barr have each explicitly disputed that description.

At least four Trump associates, including Trump’s former national security adviser Michael Flynn, have pleaded guilty to lying to federal agents during the Russia-related investigation.

Another Trump associate, the president’s former attorney Michael Cohen, has pleaded guilty to lying to Congress about Trump’s business dealings in Moscow. And former Trump adviser Roger Stone has been charged with lying to Congress about his alleged role in tracking information stolen from Democrats during the 2016 presidential campaign.

Mueller’s investigation grew out of a probe the FBI launched in late July 2016.

By then, the FBI was already scrutinizing Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort’s business dealings with pro-Russian officials in Ukraine – dealings that have since landed Manafort in jail. And the FBI was keeping tabs on Trump adviser Carter Page, who was previously targeted for recruitment by Russian spies and had raised eyebrows with a trip to Moscow in mid-July 2016.

But claims by Trump adviser George Papadopoulos – that the Russians were touting “dirt” on Clinton – really set off alarms inside the FBI.

“If any Americans were part of helping the Russians [attack] us, that is a very big deal,” James Comey, who was FBI director at the time, later told lawmakers.

Several weeks after formally launching the Russia probe, counterintelligence agents leading the investigation in Washington received a so-called “dossier,” which had been compiled at the behest of Democrats and detailed uncorroborated allegations of coordination between Trump’s campaign and the Kremlin.

Some of the allegations involved Page, who was already on the FBI’s radar, so agents began secretly intercepting his communications. Page has never been charged with any crimes.

The wide-ranging investigation continued even after Trump took office. After Jeff Sessions became attorney general, he recused himself from oversight of the FBI’s Russia-related probe, citing his previous advocacy for Trump on the campaign trail.

Rosenstein subsequently assumed oversight of the investigation.

And then Trump shocked the federal law enforcement community: He fired Comey.

The move prompted Rosenstein to appoint Mueller to take over the whole matter, including a review of whether Comey's firing and other actions meant Trump improperly tried to obstruct the probe.

Comey later alleged that in a private meeting with Trump before his removal, the president directed Comey to “let [Flynn] go.”

Mueller has not released any evidence suggesting Trump committed a crime related to Russian efforts.

However, Mueller did uncover evidence of other possible crimes and referred those cases to other federal prosecutors.

The U.S. Attorney’s Office in Manhattan ended up tying Trump to federal campaign violations, alleging that – in the midst of the 2016 presidential campaign – Trump personally directed Cohen to silence two woman claiming affairs with Trump by making illegal payments to them; Trump has repeatedly denied the affairs.

Cohen has pleaded guilty for his role in the matter, but no other charges have been filed.

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ABC News(WASHINGTON) -- Back in February 2018, special counsel Robert Mueller's team of prosecutors brought charges against 13 Russian individuals and three Russian businesses for their alleged role in what one of the accused had allegedly described as "information warfare" -- a sophisticated influence operation targeting the 2016 presidential election. But it wasn't until almost a year later that Mueller's team revealed that those weren't the only suspected trolls the U.S. government had in its sights.

In a court filing arguing against sharing "sensitive" information with some of the defendants, Mueller’s team said in January that some of the information it had “identifies uncharged individuals and entities that the government believes are continuing to engage in operations that interfere with lawful U.S. government functions like those activities charged in the indictment.”

Two months later, no other suspects have been charged, and a senior Justice Department official told ABC News Friday that Mueller was not recommending any more indictments -- presumably including the suspected Russians. So now that Mueller's investigation has concluded, what fate awaits them?

Experts told ABC News Saturday that just because Mueller is done, it doesn’t mean the Russians are in the clear legally, depending on how the U.S. government wants to proceed.

“Charges involving other trolls could be brought by other [Department of Justice] offices, whether a U.S. attorney’s office or main Justice,” Randall Eliason, a former federal prosecutor and lecturer at George Washington University, said.

Another former federal prosecutor, Ken White, agreed.

“Other federal prosecutors could absolutely charge them,” he said.

Eliason said that since Mueller’s mandate was in part to investigate interference in the 2016 presidential election, “any more recent efforts probably would fall outside his mandate” and become the responsibility of another DOJ office.

Such was the case in October when the Justice Department charged Russian national Elena Khusyaynova for “her alleged role in a Russian conspiracy to interfere in the U.S. political system, including the 2018 midterm election.”

Though she is accused of being involved in the same alleged conspiracy as the St. Petersburg troll factory that was the epicenter of the 2016 influence operation, the charges against Khusyaynova were for more recent purported actions and were brought by prosecutors in the Eastern District of Virginia, instead of Mueller.

But it’s still an open question as to whether the U.S. would choose to legally pursue more Russian nationals. All of the Russian individuals charged so far in connection to the interference operation have declined to answer the accusations in court and are believed to be safely in Russia, outside the reach of U.S. law enforcement.

Former senior CIA officer John Sipher said that from an intelligence perspective, it was unusual for the U.S. government to charge the Russians that it did, but a necessary step for Mueller to fulfill his mandate to investigate Russian interference.

Sipher, who once ran the agency’s Russia operations, said he wouldn’t be surprised if the U.S. held off from filing further legal action because it may be more valuable to track the suspects’ activity than to file charges against them.

Khusyaynova’s case notwithstanding, Sipher said now that Mueller’s done, he expects “we will revert to our normal process of uncovering and tracking hostile intelligence resources.

“For what it’s worth, the Russians indicted by the Mueller probe were just a tiny fraction of what the U.S. intelligence community knows about Russian intelligence, and Russian intelligence officers,” Sipher said.

The Russian government has long denied the allegations of election interference.

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- The ranking member of the House Intelligence Committee said Sunday that everyone, including President Donald Trump's personal attorney Rudy Giuliani, should wait until special counsel Robert Mueller's report is released to the public before making pronouncements on vindication.

Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, suggested on This Week that the president is not clear of all wrong-doing and that there has already been "significant evidence of collusion" between Trump's campaign team and Russian officials to sway the 2016 presidential election in Trump's favor.

Giuliani tweeted that there is no evidence of collusion and wrote that "I trust [Schiff] will apologize for his mistake. We all make them. The real virtue is to admit it. It would help us heal."

But Schiff said Sunday that Giuliani would be wise to wait until the special prosecutor's report is made public before asking him to apologize.

"Mr. Giuliani would be wise to do something he has rarely done, and that is wait 'til we see the facts," he told ABC News Chief Anchor George Stephanopoulos on Sunday.

Separately, Schiff wrote on Twitter that "Mueller’s investigation began as a counterintelligence inquiry into whether individuals associated with the Trump campaign were compromised by a foreign power. By law, that evidence he uncovered must be shared with our Committee. And his report must also be made public. Now."

Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, the ranking member on the House Oversight Committee, said on This Week that while he has yet to see Mueller's report, he has yet to see "one bit of evidence to show any type of coordination, collusion, conspiracy between the Trump campaign and Russia to influence the election."

"Look, the central change of the special counsel was to see if there was conspiracy, coordination or collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia to impact the election. Like I've said, that was the focus of the entire special counsel investigation. We've not seen any of that."

In a letter to the leaders of the House and Senate Judiciary committees, Attorney General William Barr wrote that he is reviewing Mueller's report and anticipates that he "may be in a position to advise you of the Special Counsel's principal conclusions as soon as this weekend." He continued that, separately, he intends to "consult with Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein and special counsel Robert Mueller to determine what other information from the report can be released to Congress and the public consistent with the law."

A senior Department of Justice official told ABC News on Friday that the report will not include any further indictments.

Mueller and his team investigated how far the Kremlin went to interfere in the 2016 presidential election, including trying to determine whether any Americans may have helped those efforts.

At the heart of Mueller’s probe were two Russian operations: the spread of disinformation on social media, and the release of thousands of sensitive emails stolen by hackers from the Democratic National Committee and other Democratic targets. Mueller’s team has charged 25 Russian nationals and three foreign companies for their alleged role in those operations.

Ahead of any of the report being made public, Schiff said Sunday that "it's too early" to tell if Congress will no longer consider impeachment.

"If there were overwhelming evidence of criminality on the president's part, then Congress would need to consider that remedy if indictment is foreclosed," he told Stephanopoulos.

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Alex Wong/Getty Images(PALM BEACH, Fla.) -- Just after news broke that Special Counsel Robert Mueller had finished his 22 month long investigation into alleged Russian meddling in the 2016 campaign, President Donald Trump appeared to exhale.

The president who was described by sources as being in a “great mood” spent a festive evening dining on the patio at Mar-a-Lago with First Lady Melania Trump, the first lady’s parents, and the couple’s son, Barron.

At one point, the family joined by other club members sang “Happy Birthday” to Barron who was celebrating his 13th birthday.

Trump told those gathered at the president’s Palm Beach retreat he was “glad it’s over.”

For the last several weeks, as Washington waited for the special counsel to deliver his final report, sources close to the president have described him as antsy -- constantly asking questions about what the report would look like, how much detail would it provide and whether it would deepen the legal and political challenges facing him and his family.

When the call arrived Friday night that Mueller had handed off his report to Attorney General William Barr – and would not pursue additional indictments -- the questions stopped, the sources told ABC News.

The White House has not been briefed on the contents of the special counsel’s report, according to administration officials.

However, the president, who once described the probe as “a cloud over my head,” told one source he felt the cloud had been lifted.

After dinner, the president addressed supporters briefly at a Republican fundraiser but made no mention of Mueller, according to those present.

Trump later returned to the patio at his Florida country club. He and the first lady sat with Donald Trump Jr and his girlfriend former Fox News anchor Kimberly Guilfoyle, as they sipped coffee.

At one point on Friday evening, Trump was briefly praising Attorney General Barr for his leadership, according to a source close the president.

"We feel very prepared for the results. We feel like we're going to be fine,” one administration official told ABC News. “There's a feeling of it is what is it and it's not a very big deal. There isn't an enormous sense of concern. But let's see the facts."

The president had not offered any public reaction in remarks or on Twitter as of early Saturday. Several aides noted his restraint with surprise, especially in regards to his Twitter account. For nearly the last two years, the president has been on an almost daily tirade about the special counsel’s probe calling it a “hoax” and a “witch hunt.”

The president was in Mar-a-Lago for planned meetings with the leaders of various Caribbean nations and was joined on the trip by White House Counsel Pat Cipollone. A late add to the manifest of Air Force One: another White House lawyer, Emmet Flood, who serves as the main lawyer handling issues related to the presidency as it relates to the Mueller investigation.

Sources said the attorneys accompanied the president as a precaution when it appeared possible that Mueller would be concluding his work. As speculation mounted Friday that Mueller would be sending a report to Barr, White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders quickly raced to join the president on his trip.

In the letter to Congress Barr submitted Friday, he said he could be sharing the “principal conclusions” of the report with lawmakers as soon as this weekend. Barr arrived at his office at the Department of Justice mid-morning Saturday and sources tell ABC News he is expected to read Mueller’s report for much of the day.

Democrats on Capitol Hill have a conference call led by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi slated for Saturday afternoon to go over strategy on dealing with Mueller’s findings and Barr’s report according to a senior Democratic leadership aide.

With the 2020 campaign already heating up, the Trump re-election team is already preparing their victory lap.

A separate source close to the Trump campaign told ABC News Trump allies may soon take to the airwaves regarding Democrats reaction to the special counsel’s probe. Several had already started field testing a new line of response, saying they had not “seen so many disappointed or sad faces since election night 2016.”

In the meantime, the president spent Saturday golfing at his Palm Beach club. As Trump rode back to his residence, he was greeted by a few dozen supporters waving signs according to a press pool report. One of the signs read: “Trump is better than Reagan.”

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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- Attorney General Wiliam Barr headed into work on Saturday morning to read special counsel Robert Mueller's report.

The much-anticipated report was handed to the Justice Department for Barr’s review, and Congress was notified of the transfer late Friday afternoon, according to a Justice Department spokeswoman.

After reviewing Mueller's report, Barr will then send what he has described as his own "report" on the Mueller investigation to the top Democrats and Republicans on the House and Senate Judiciary committees. Barr has promised to be as transparent as possible, but it's unclear how extensive or detailed Barr's own "report" to Congress will be.

In a letter to the leaders of the House and Senate Judiciary committees, Barr wrote that he is reviewing the report and anticipates that he "may be in a position to advise you of the Special Counsel's principal conclusions as soon as this weekend." He continued that, separately, he intends to "consult with Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein and Special Counsel Mueller to determine what other information from the report can be released to Congress and the public consistent with the law."

"The next steps are up to Attorney General Barr, and we look forward to the process taking its course. The White House has not received or been briefed on the Special Counsel’s report," White House press secretary Sarah Sanders tweeted on Friday afternoon.

A senior Department of Justice official told ABC News on Friday that the report will not include any further indictments.

Mueller and his team investigated how far the Kremlin went to interfere in the 2016 presidential election, including trying to determine whether any Americans may have helped those efforts.

At the heart of Mueller’s probe were two Russian operations: the spread of disinformation on social media, and the release of thousands of sensitive emails stolen by hackers from the Democratic National Committee and other Democratic targets. Mueller’s team has charged 25 Russian nationals and three foreign companies for their alleged role in those operations.

In appointing a special counsel to investigate, however, Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein also directed Mueller to look into “allegations” of possible “coordination” between Russian operatives and associates of President Donald Trump.

Trump and his Republican allies have derided the investigation as a “witch hunt.” But Rosenstein, FBI Director Chris Wray and Barr have each explicitly disputed that description.

At least four Trump associates, including Trump’s former national security adviser Michael Flynn, have pleaded guilty to lying to federal agents during the Russia-related investigation.

Another Trump associate, the president’s former attorney Michael Cohen, has pleaded guilty to lying to Congress about Trump’s business dealings in Moscow. And former Trump adviser Roger Stone has been charged with lying to Congress about his alleged role in tracking information stolen from Democrats during the 2016 presidential campaign.

Mueller’s investigation grew out of a probe the FBI launched in late July 2016.

By then, the FBI was already scrutinizing Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort’s business dealings with pro-Russian officials in Ukraine – dealings that have since landed Manafort in jail. And the FBI was keeping tabs on Trump adviser Carter Page, who was previously targeted for recruitment by Russian spies and had raised eyebrows with a trip to Moscow in mid-July 2016.

But claims by Trump adviser George Papadopoulos – that the Russians were touting “dirt” on Clinton – really set off alarms inside the FBI.

“If any Americans were part of helping the Russians [attack] us, that is a very big deal,” James Comey, who was FBI director at the time, later told lawmakers.

Several weeks after formally launching the Russia probe, counterintelligence agents leading the investigation in Washington received a so-called “dossier,” which had been compiled at the behest of Democrats and detailed uncorroborated allegations of coordination between Trump’s campaign and the Kremlin.

Some of the allegations involved Page, who was already on the FBI’s radar, so agents began secretly intercepting his communications. Page has never been charged with any crimes.

The wide-ranging investigation continued even after Trump took office. After Jeff Sessions became attorney general, he recused himself from oversight of the FBI’s Russia-related probe, citing his previous advocacy for Trump on the campaign trail.

Rosenstein subsequently assumed oversight of the investigation.

And then Trump shocked the federal law enforcement community: He fired Comey.

The move prompted Rosenstein to appoint Mueller to take over the whole matter, including a review of whether Comey's firing and other actions meant Trump improperly tried to obstruct the probe.

Comey later alleged that in a private meeting with Trump before his removal, the president directed Comey to “let [Flynn] go.”

Mueller has not released any evidence suggesting Trump committed a crime related to Russian efforts.

However, Mueller did uncover evidence of other possible crimes and referred those cases to other federal prosecutors.

The U.S. Attorney’s Office in Manhattan ended up tying Trump to federal campaign violations, alleging that – in the midst of the 2016 presidential campaign – Trump personally directed Cohen to silence two woman claiming affairs with Trump by making illegal payments to them; Trump has repeatedly denied the affairs.

Cohen has pleaded guilty for his role in the matter, but no other charges have been filed.

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@ElizabethWarren/Twitter(BIRMINGHAM, Alabama) -- Massachusetts senator and presidential hopeful Elizabeth Warren pushed to galvanize black voters and local Democrats in the Delta region during her three-state tour in Tennessee, Mississippi, and Alabama, a region that has typically voted Republican in past U.S. elections.

"I’m running to be president of all the people. And it’s important to go around the country and have a chance to talk with people face-to-face," Warren said while kicking off her tour in front of 500 rally attendees inside Douglass High School, a predominantly black high school, in North Memphis, Tennessee, on Sunday.

Her tour of the deep South is the latest in a series of 2020 presidential candidate swings through predominantly black cities and neighborhoods as Democrats work to court that voting bloc. This weekend, former Texas Rep. Beto O'Rourke, Sen. Cory Booker and South Bend, Ind. Mayor Buttigieg are all headed to South Carolina -- a state where African-Americans make up nearly 30 percent of the population. In January, Sen. Bernie Sanders' swing through the Palmetto State included speeches at churches, community centers and colleges where he reminded voters repeatedly about his civil rights upbringing, having marched with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. during the March on Washington as a college student.

African-Americans are expected to have significant influence in the Democratic primaries and minorities will account for a third of eligible voters in 2020, according to Pew Research.

One of the topics a number of Democratic candidates have brought up, seemingly aimed at African American voters, is the centuries-old debate over some form of reparations for the descendants of Africans brought to America and enslaved and those impacted by subsequent discriminatory policies such as segregation.

"I believe it’s time to start the national full-blown conversation about reparations in this country," Warren said in a CNN town hall at Jackson State University in Mississippi on Monday.

"I support the bill in the House to appoint a congressional panel of experts, people that are studying this and talk about different ways we may be able to do it and make a report back to Congress, so that we can as a nation do what's right and begin to heal," Warren continued.

The Massachusetts senator is joined by other presidential hopefuls such as Booker, author Marianne Williamson, former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julian Castro and Calif. Sen. Kamala Harris who have all said they support some form of reparations. Sanders, when pressed during a recent CNN questioned "what does that mean" but underscored that his policies would help funnel money into impoverished communities and help people "hurt from the legacy of slavery."

"America has a history of 200 years of slavery. We had Jim Crow. We had legal segregation in America for a very long time," Harris said on the nationally syndicated radio show, ‘The Breakfast Club which is hosted by DJ Envy, Angela Yee and Charlamagne tha God and is popular in urban markets. "People aren’t starting out on the same base in terms of their ability to succeed and so we have got to recognize that and give people a lift up."

During Warren's trek through the Delta region, she met with prominent black local leaders to promote her affordable housing plan.

In Cleveland, Mississippi, Warren met with senator Willie Simmons and civil rights leader Amzie Moore, the first black person in Cleveland’s Bolivar County to receive a home loan, to discuss poverty and local housing issues. In her second Mississippi stop, she toured with Mayor Errick Simmons in Greenville, Mississippi, a city of roughly 30,000, where local officials estimate just over 2,000 people are in need of housing.

"Building new housing in our community is a big priority for us just because of the lack of affordable, quality housing," said Daniel Boggs, CEO of the Greater Greenville Housing & Revitalization Association, who attended a housing roundtable with Warren and Simmons. His organization has about 700 applicants who are hoping to receive affordable units.

Warren stressed that communities should be empowered to create affordable housing solutions.

"It’s not for the federal government to come here to Greenville and say, 'Build this, or build that.' It’s for the federal government to say, ‘what’s your plan to provide for your people, and how can we be a good partner in that?'" Warren said. "Being a good partner, in this case, means money. And we need to put the money on the ground in places like Greenville.

When asked how her proposed housing plan will affect African-Americans, a demographic that is far less likely to be homeowners compared to their white counterparts according to a Pew research study, Warren told ABC News: "this bill also has a special provision in it to try to help close the black-white wealth gap and housing gap. It particularly targets people living in areas that were formally redlined and people who were cheated during the housing crash and offers specific help to them. And it gives them a chance to build wealth over time."

On the third leg of her tour, U.S. Representative Terri Sewell, D-Ala., gave Warren a tour of Selma, starting at the historic Brown Chapel AME Church and ending at the historic Edmund Pettus Bridge, as journalists and photographers documented their conversation early Tuesday.

Brown Chapel was the meeting place for civil rights protesters who attempted to cross the Edmund Pettus Bridge before being attacked by law enforcement in what became known as "Bloody Sunday." The horrific event was the catalyst for the Voting Rights Act of 1965, the 15th amendment signed by Lyndon B. Johnson, protecting African- Americans’ right to cast their ballot.

"I believe we ought to appeal all the voter suppression laws," Warren told ABC News while promoting her push to end the electoral college on said May 19. "We need to be an America where voting matters for everyone and part of that is making sure candidates come to all of America and make the case for why they should be president of the United states."

The Senator continued to rally support for her call the end the Electoral College at an organizing event in Birmingham.

"Start pushing your state legislature to sign on as well!" said Warren to a crowd that responded with audible hesitation.

"This is not a red versus blue. Push these guys here. You can do this as the state level. If nothing else you can make them a little uncomfortable. Don’t take no for an answer on this," Warren told the crowd.

The crowd’s hesitation may stem from the deep frustration of democratic voters in Alabama who often feel like they are outnumbered in the majority Republican state.

"We need to have our say. Our votes should count and that’s the problem right now. I voted in every election since I turned 18 and especially here in Alabama I feel like I don’t really have a say because of the Electoral College," said Jessica Huff, a public school teacher who attended Warren’s Birmingham rally.

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Webster County Jail(FORT DODGE, Iowa) -- A man was arrested Friday for throwing a glass of water in the face of controversial Rep. Steve King at a local restaurant, police said.

Blake Gibbins, 26, allegedly approached King while he was eating lunch at Mineral City Mill and Grill restaurant in Fort Dodge, Iowa. He asked King if he was the congressman and then threw a glass of water on him, Fort Dodge police said in a press release. The release says others were also hit by the water, but no one was injured.

Gibbins was arrested on two counts of misdemeanor simple assault and one count of disorderly conduct, police said.

According to the press release, King was "specifically targeted due to his position as a United States Representative."

King, R-Iowa, has come under fire -- even by members of his own party -- for comments construed as racist and homophobic.

In January, King said in an interview with The New York Times that he didn't understand why the terms "white supremacy" and "white nationalism" were considered offensive.

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., called the comments "beneath the dignity of the Party of Lincoln and the United States of America."

"Anyone who needs 'white nationalist' or 'white supremacist' defined, described and defended does lack some pretty common knowledge," Sen. Tim Scott, of South Carolina, the only black Republican in the Senate, wrote in a rebuke to King's comments in the Times.

King was removed from his committee assignments in January in the wake of his comments to the Times. While discussed, a censure vote was never held.

The House did vote on a "resolution of disapproval" against King. The vote was passed, 424-1, with only Democratic Rep. Bobby Rush voting against it -- saying censure was necessary.

The New York Times comments were just the latest in a number of controversial stances, including referring to Mexican immigrants as "dirt" last November and blasting a Supreme Court ruling making gay marriage legal.

King even denigrated Hurricane Katrina survivors just this week when he told a town hall in Iowa all they did was ask for help from FEMA, while people in Iowa help each other.

Gibbins, who is from Lafayette, Colorado, was released from Webster County Jail on bond.

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- Since May 2017, the special counsel’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election has been a constant presence in U.S. politics – a complex narrative that has included a rotating cast of characters and myriad plotlines.

Here is a roundup of the various figures who have been connected to the investigation at various points since President Donald Trump took office in January 2017.

Jeff Sessions

The two conversations that former attorney general Jeff Sessions had with Russian ambassador Sergei Kislyak – both of which happened during the campaign when Sessions was a very public supporter of Trump – were confirmed by the Department of Justice the day before he recused himself from any existing or future probes related to the presidential campaign. Without that recusal, Sessions would have been the one to oversee any such probes given his role as attorney general.

In a statement on March 2, 2017, Sessions said that over several weeks he met with "relevant senior career department officials" to discuss whether he should recuse himself and, "having concluded those meetings today, I have decided to recuse myself from any existing or future investigations of any matters related in any way to the campaigns for president of the United States."

The recusal made Sessions one of Trump’s favorite targets, with the president regularly blasting Sessions for failing to warn him that he might have to recuse himself.

In November, Sessions resigned at the request of President Trump and Sessions' chief of staff, Matthew G. Whitaker, a former U.S. attorney, took on the acting attorney general role. In February, William Barr, Trump's nominee and the attorney general under President George H.W. Bush from 1991 to 1993 was confirmed and sworn-in as attorney general. Barr now heads the Justice Department during a pivotal time, overseeing special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into Russian interference of the 2016 presidential election.

Rod Rosenstein

After then-Attorney General Sessions recused himself from campaign related investigations, Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein oversaw the Russia investigation. Rosenstein appointed Mueller as special counsel in May of 2017.

Since that time, Rosenstein has overseen Mueller’s probe, at times publicly defending the investigation from criticisms lodged by Republicans and the president. Rosenstein has appeared before Congress several times since taking the reins of the probe. Once Attorney General William Barr was sworn-in in February, Rosenstein was no longer in charge of overseeing Mueller's investigation.

ABC News reported that Rosenstein plans to leave the Department of Justice in mid-March.

James Comey

Former FBI Director James Comey was initially associated with the 2016 election after gaining notoriety for his public updates into the investigation into Hillary Clinton's use of a private email server during her tenure as secretary of state.

His role in the Clinton email investigation was cited in the letter that Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein issued calling for his dismissal in May 2017.

"I remember just thinking, ‘This is a lie.’ The stuff about, you know, being fired because of the Hillary Clinton email investigation, that makes no sense at all," Comey told ABC News Chief Anchor George Stephanopoulos in April 2018. "And then, of course, I quickly saw on the news that you know, the White House saying that the FBI was in tatters and the workforce -- it was relieved that I was fired. More and more lies. And so I was worried about the organization, worried about the people."

Right after he was dismissed, the White House publicly denied that Trump was considering the handling of the FBI investigation into his campaign’s possible ties with Russia when he fired Comey.

But then, a couple of days later, Trump himself appeared to contradict that in an interview with Lester Holt of NBC News.

“When I decided to just do it, I said to myself, I said, 'You know, this Russia thing with Trump and Russia is a made up story, it's an excuse by the Democrats for having lost an election that they should have won,'" Trump told Holt.

Matthew Whitaker

Matthew Whitaker was named as the acting-attorney general on Nov. 8, 2018.

Though Rosenstein had been overseeing the Russia probe during Sessions' tenure because of his recusal, that then shifted to Whitaker when he became the acting attorney general. Whitaker had previously criticized the probe – a point of contention for Democrats when he appeared at a recent hearing before the House Judiciary Committee.

Whitaker defended his performance saying that he had "not interfered in any way with the special counsel's investigation," but he refused to say whether he had discussed the Michael Cohen case with President Trump.

In March, shortly after Bill Barr was confirmed as attorney general, ABC News reported that Whitaker left the Justice Department.

Bill Barr

Trump named Bill Barr as his new pick for attorney general in December of 2018, exactly one month after the departure of Jeff Sessions. He previously served as the nation’s top law enforcement official during former President George H.W. Bush’s administration.

Barr attempted to make it clear to wary Democrats on the Senate Judiciary Committee during his confirmation hearing that he will not unnecessarily or inappropriately interfere with the Russia investigation, but he did not commit to a full public release of Mueller's report as Democrats wanted.

At one point during his opening remarks in January, Barr noted how he has known Mueller “for 30 years” and how they “worked closely together” during his earlier time at the Department of Justice.

“When he was named special counsel, I said his selection was ‘good news’ and that, knowing him, I had confidence he would handle the matter properly. And I still have that confidence today,” Barr said of Mueller during the hearing.

At an earlier hearing, Barr said that he thinks “it is in the best interest of everyone…. that this matter be resolved by allowing the special counsel to complete his work.” Barr was confirmed by the Senate and sworn in in February.

Paul Manafort

In the years prior to joining the Trump orbit, Manafort’s political consulting work focused largely abroad, working for Ukraine's since-toppled President Viktor Yanukovych, and his political party, the Party of Regions, starting in 2006 and continuing until at least 2010.

In the United States, Manafort, 69, was known in Republican Party politics for decades – having worked for Presidents Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush – before joining the Trump campaign in March 2016 as the campaign’s convention manager and then getting promoted to campaign chairman two months later.

Manafort was found guilty on eight counts of financial crimes as part of the first major prosecution won by the team led by special counsel Robert Mueller's team.

On the eve of a second trial in Washington, DC, in September, Manafort pleaded guilty to two counts of conspiracy and agreed to cooperate with prosecutors.

But that plea deal was short-lived. The special counsel’s office accused Manafort of lying to prosecutors after agreeing to cooperate, which they say amounted to a breach of his agreement. Defense counsel claimed Manafort did not intentionally lie, but the federal judge overseeing his case sided with prosecutors.

He has been behind bars since June after the judge in his D.C. case revoked his bail amid allegations of witness tampering. Sentencing dates in both courts have been set and delayed after the Office of Special Counsel moved to set aside the plea deal based on the allegations that Manafort had lied.

The special counsel's office has since filed a sentencing memo for Manafort in Virginia, in which prosecutors agreed with the findings of an independent pre-sentence report, which calculated that Manafort’s crimes call for a prison sentence of up to 25 years.

Michael Flynn

The first and only Trump White House aide to plead guilty to a crime in special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into Russian influence operations targeting the 2016 presidential election was a decorated retired military intelligence officer, Army Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn, who the president had insisted serve as his White House national security adviser.

In prosecuting Flynn for lying to FBI agents, a felony, about his discussions with Russian Ambassador Sergey Kislyak about U.S. sanctions and other subjects, prior to Trump being sworn in as the 45th U.S. president, Mueller not only secured a key witness but he also sent a message to other witnesses in the probe to cooperate fully – though several more Trump campaign aides later admitted to lying to the FBI anyway.

Rick Gates

Gates was a Trump campaign aide who was brought into the then-future-president’s orbit by his longtime boss Manafort. Gates served as the government’s star witness in their trial against Manafort, and Gates admitted that they shielded millions of dollars in offshore accounts to keep it away from tax collectors.

Gates was charged in two separate federal courts in connection to financial crimes, unregistered foreign lobbying and on allegations that he made false statements to federal prosecutors.

Gates pleaded guilty in Washington, D.C., in February 2018 on counts of conspiracy against the United States and lying to federal prosecutors. As part of his plea agreement, he avoided prosecution on a slew of financial charges in the Eastern District of Virginia that included assisting in the preparation of false income taxes, bank fraud, bank fraud conspiracy and false income taxes.

His charges are intimately tied to those of Manafort. In the Eastern District of Virginia, the two were indicted jointly.

Konstantin Kilimnik

Kilimnik is a longtime business associate of Paul Manafort’s who was responsible for overseeing the Kiev, Ukraine office of Manafort’s lobbying firm.

In August of 2016, shortly after the Republican National Convention, Manafort, his business associate Rick Gates, and Kilimnik met at the Grand Havana Room, a cigar club in New York. In a closed-door hearing in Manafort's case in early February, special counsel prosecutor Andrew Weissmann told the judge that the meeting goes "very much to the heart of what the special counsel's office is investigating."

Earlier Manafort indictments refer to a "Person A" who was identified by sources as Kilimnik. However, he was formally identified in a third superseding indictment against him and Manafort, which accused Kilimnik of conspiracy to obstruct justice and obstruction of justice.

The charges he faces are linked largely to an attempt to relay messages from Manafort in his alleged attempt to tamper with potential witnesses in the case against him.

Kilmnik has been identified as having ties to Russian intelligence. Though he's been indicted, he has not entered a plea. He remains out of reach of U.S. law enforcement.

Michael Cohen

One of the longest-serving members of the Trump inner circle who has come under scrutiny is Michael Cohen, Trump's former personal attorney and longtime fixer.

Cohen's activity during the campaign came into the national spotlight in reference to payments made to two women who alleged that they had affairs with Trump, affairs Trump has denied.

In August 2018, Cohen pleaded guilty to eight counts, including two related to illegal campaign contributions "in coordination and at the direction of a candidate for federal office." The charges were brought by federal prosecutors in the Southern District of New York.

He was sentenced to three years in prison for charges including campaign finance violations, tax evasion, and lying to Congress.

According to court documents, Cohen admitted that he made the misstatements about the “Moscow Project” – the Trump Organization’s efforts to “pursue a branded property in Moscow” in an August 2017 letter to the House and Senate intelligence committees, which were conducting inquiries into alleged collusion and Russian interference.

Ultimately, the proposed plan to build a Trump tower in Moscow was scrapped.

Cohen has cooperated with Mueller and participated in multiple interview sessions with investigators from the office of special counsel Mueller, totaling more than 40 hours, sources told ABC News.

Roger Stone

Given his decades-long role in Republican politics, Stone was one of the better-known members of the extended Trump network of campaign advisers.

His colorful history – from the tattoo of former President Richard Nixon that he has on his back, to being a self-described “dirty trickster in Republican politics for decades” made him one of the most visible politicos in Trump’s orbit.

Stone was arrested in January after Mueller filed a seven-count indictment against him as part of the ongoing probe into Russia interference during the 2016 presidential election.

The special counsel leveled against Stone, 66, five counts of lying to Congress, one count of obstruction of an official proceeding, and one count of witness tampering. He has pleaded not guilty and the federal judge overseeing his case has since issued a gag order on all parties involved in the case – including the gregarious Stone.

Carter Page

Page was a foreign policy adviser to the Trump campaign and came under FBI scrutiny during the campaign itself because according to the FISA application, the FBI believed he had been the subject of targeted recruitment by the Russian government, according to an application with the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court. Page is alleged to have had “established relationships with Russian Government officials, including Russian intelligence officers.”

Page told Stephanopoulos in February 2018 that there was "no basis" for the FBI to eavesdrop on him and called their investigation “just complete ridiculousness.”

Felix Sater

The Soviet-born American businessman, who, along with Michael Cohen, held discussions with Russians about a possible Trump tower in Russia used to describe himself as a “senior advisor to Donald Trump. Sater is also a convicted felon and one-time stock scammer who promised to "get all of Putin's team to buy in" on a proposed plan to build "Trump Tower Moscow" in the heat of the presidential campaign.

Donald Trump Jr.

One known contact that several members of the Trump team had with Russians during the campaign came through a meeting arranged through pop music promoter Rob Goldstone with the president’s son, Donald Trump Jr, and a Russian attorney in Trump Tower on June 9, 2016.

Accounts of the motive for the meeting, the nature of the meeting and the attendees involved changed after The New York Times first reported about the meeting in July 2017. The initial statement about the meeting – which it was later determined to have been drafted by President Trump – said that the meeting was about adoption policy.

But as emails released by Trump Jr. show, he believed he was meeting the lawyer, Natalia Veselnitskaya, to obtain damaging information about his father's then-Democratic rival Hillary Clinton. In addition to Trump Jr., two other key Trump campaign officials attended the meeting -– then-chairman Paul Manafort and campaign adviser and Trump son-in-law Jared Kushner.

In a statement on behalf of Donald Trump Jr., Trump Organization attorney Alan Futerfas previously said, “Donald Trump Jr. has been professional and responsible throughout the Mueller and Congressional investigations. We are very confident of the accuracy and reliability of the information that has been provided by Mr. Trump, Jr., and on his behalf.”

Jared Kushner

Kushner, who married into the Trump family when he wed Ivanka Trump, was an ever-present member of the Trump campaign and remains a key senior adviser in the administration.

Because of his intimate role in the campaign, as well as his presence at the Trump Tower meeting with the Russian lawyer, questions about his contacts with Russians and knowledge of others’ were inevitable.

In July 2017, Kushner became the first Trump family member questioned by the Senate Intelligence Committee as part of the investigations into Russian meddling. He released a statement before the closed-door session denying any collusion with Russia.

"Let me be very clear: I did not collude with Russia, nor do I know of anyone else in the campaign who did so. I had no improper contacts. I have not relied on Russian funds for my businesses," Kushner said.

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Alex Wong/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- As special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation heated up over the past 22 months, so, too, did President Donald Trump's attacks -- first on the probe itself and later, increasingly on Mueller personally.

Firing off almost daily tweets, making angry, dismissive comments in photo-ops or interviews -- Trump's remarks coalesced into a relentless strategy to discredit Mueller's investigation, as he's said countless times, as nothing more than a "witch hunt" and a "hoax."

As of late, the president has sought to undermine Mueller, a former deputy attorney general and FBI director himself, in the American public's eye by calling him a “man out of the blue,” appointed by an obscure Justice Department official, without confirmation.

Trump, on the other hand, won more than 63 million votes to score his position as president, he pointed out Wednesday.

In reality, Mueller was not appointed randomly, but by Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein because Trump's then-attorney general, Jeff Sessions, recused himself due to conflict of interest.

It’s been a long two years for all involved, and perhaps no more than for Mueller, who is in charge of an investigation that -- despite the president's attempts to paint it as unfounded -- began with the president's own decision to fire then-FBI Director James Comey while he headed an investigation into possible Trump campaign's ties to Russia.

According to a New York Times accounting, Trump attacked Mueller and the Russia investigations more than 1,100 times over two years — with the vast majority of the criticism coming in the last six months.

The president consistently denies any collusion. He repeatedly accuses the “17 Angry Democrats” he claims work for Mueller of bias.

Bob Mueller (who is a much different man than people think) and his out of control band of Angry Democrats, don’t want the truth, they only want lies. The truth is very bad for their mission!

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) December 3, 2018

Sometimes, like a game of pinball, the president’s takes bounced between treating Mueller with respect and then derision.

There was the Mueller who would be “fair,” who Trump was “looking forward to talking to” -- and now, there’s the Mueller who ran a probe that the president described as “bulls—t” intended to take him down.

Has Trump's attack strategy worked?

In January, half of Americans said they either had “just some” confidence or none at all that the Mueller report will be fair and evenhanded, and 43 percent say they have at least a good amount of confidence in its fairness, according to polling conducted by ABC News and the Washington Post.

Along partisan lines, the trust is more divided. 62 percent of Democrats trust Mueller, but from there it slides to 40 percent among political independents and just 22 percent among Republicans.

At the same time, Americans overall still back Mueller’s probe by 63-29 percent. Fifty-two percent support it strongly.

The attacks on Mueller are unlikely to actually change anyone’s views, said Dartmouth College public opinion professor Mia Costa. But political science is clear: people take cues from politicians in charge.

“Public trust in the investigation was always going to be divided along partisan lines, with Republicans opposing it more than they support it and vice versa for Democrats,” Costa said.

“However, consistent rhetoric about the investigation could deepen the partisan divide on the issue; people take cues from political elites and the more it is on the public's consciousness, the more it becomes a salient issue to feel strongly about,” she said.

So far, Mueller has indicted 34 people and three Russian business entities. He’s scored seven guilty pleas and five people charged have been sentenced to prison.

The Rigged Russian Witch Hunt goes on and on as the “originators and founders” of this scam continue to be fired and demoted for their corrupt and illegal activity. All credibility is gone from this terrible Hoax, and much more will be lost as it proceeds. No Collusion!

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) August 15, 2018

Trump has reacted by discounting the charges as biased, by skirting the reality of the charges or by distancing himself entirely from people that worked with him directly as “people that had nothing to do with him.”

He has called many of the people indicted “bloggers from Moscow” — not Russian hackers or members of a troll farm aimed at undermining the 2016 election, which is what they have been charged with.

“Or they were people that had nothing to do with me, had nothing to do with what they're talking about, or there were people that -- that got caught telling a fib or telling a lie,” Trump said in an interview with CBS’ Margaret Brennan in February.

Of the people who have been charged, titles include Trump’s former campaign chairman, his former national security adviser and his former personal attorney, who was also a longtime fixer for the president.

But at the same time the president describes his grievances, he’s also called for the report to be released — as have most Americans, according to polling.

“Let it come out, let people see it,” Trump told reporters Wednesday, while simultaneously calling the report “ridiculous.” A few days before, he similarly called for the report to be public, saying “I don’t mind.”

“Let’s see whether or not it’s legit,” the president said Wednesday.

But with a divided electorate of American voters, it’s hard to say Trump’s rhetoric reaches those who weren’t listening to begin with.

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- The demands for complete transparency on Friday came quickly -- from Democrats and Republicans alike.

Almost immediately after news broke that special counsel Robert Mueller's report had been handed over to Attorney General William Barr, members of Congress called for the whole report to be made public.

“Now that Special Counsel Mueller has submitted his report to the Attorney General, it is imperative for Mr. Barr to make the full report public and provide its underlying documentation and findings to Congress. Attorney General Barr must not give President Trump, his lawyers or his staff any ‘sneak preview’ of Special Counsel Mueller's findings or evidence, and the White House must not be allowed to interfere in decisions about what parts of those findings or evidence are made public," said House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer in a statement.

They threatened to sue the Trump administration to get Mueller's complete report and any related evidence if the Justice Department refuses to turn it over to Congress.

Attorney General William Barr has said that after he reviews the report, he'll advise the chairmen and ranking members of relevant congressional committees about details that can be released "consistent with the law." He will do so "as soon as this weekend," Barr wrote in a letter to Congress.

Key questions now: How much will Barr share? And will Congress be able to secure the full Mueller report in order to make it public?

Pressure from Democrats and from some Republicans for full transparency was clear Friday, while other Republicans echoed Barr's careful wording at his confirmation hearing that he would try to make as much of the report public as possible under the law and Justice Department rules.

According to federal regulations, the special counsel's final report should be "a confidential report explaining the prosecution or declination decisions reached by the Special Counsel."

In a statement, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said: "I hope the Special Counsel’s report will help inform and improve our efforts to protect our democracy.

“The Attorney General has said he intends to provide as much information as possible. As I have said previously, I sincerely hope he will do so as soon as he can, and with as much openness and transparency as possible.”

Democratic leader Rep. Hakeem Jeffries sent out a blunt tweet: #MuellerTime: "Every. Single. Word."

"Full transparency. No waiting. Attorney General Barr must immediately provide Congress and the public with Mueller’s entire report and supporting material, not just his summary findings. The American people have a right to know everything,” said Democratic Sen. Chris Van Hollen of Maryland.

Rep. Jerry Nadler, the Democrat who chairs the House Judiciary Committee and one member expected to see Barr's report this weekend, said he looks forward "to getting the full Mueller report and related materials."

"Transparency and the public interest demand nothing less," he said.

Rep. Doug Collins, the top Republican on the House Judiciary Committee, also called for the entire report to be made public.

"I fully expect the Justice Department to release the special counsel’s report to this committee and to the public without delay and to the maximum extent permitted by law,” Collins said in a statement.

Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, blocked a measure in the Senate last week that would have encouraged the Justice Department to make the full report public. A resolution in the House calling for the same passed 420-0.

"I will work with Ranking Member Feinstein and our House Judiciary Committee colleagues to ensure as much transparency as possible, consistent with the law," Graham said on Twitter Friday evening.

Other Republicans defended Trump, echoing his criticisms of the investigation into ties between his 2016 presidential campaign and the Russians as a witch hunt.

"The only collusion was between Democrats and many in the media who peddled this lie because they continue to refuse to accept the results of the 2016 election. #WitchHunt." said Rep. Steve Scalise, the House Republican Whip from Louisiana.

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