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Susan Stocker - Pool/Getty Images(PARKLAND, Fla.) -- The female tipster close to accused Florida high school shooter Nikolas Cruz told the FBI Cruz was "going to explode," according to a transcript of the Jan. 5 call more than a month before the shooting obtained by ABC News.

"It’s so much and I know he’s – he’s going to explode," the woman said.

The five-page transcript of the call obtained by ABC News detailed what had been reported the FBI knew about Cruz before he killed 17 students and teachers at his former school in February. The FBI has admitted to failing to follow up on the tip called in to the FBI's call center in January and sharing it with the bureau's FBI field office.

The tipster also provided details about Cruz’s concerning social media activity, identifying four Instagram accounts and troubling posts, and sharing details about his upbringing, foster family and concerning behavior.

“I just want someone to know about this so they can look into it,” the tipster said. “If they think it’s something worth going into, fine. If not, um, I just know I have a clear conscience if he takes off and, and just starts shooting places up.”

On the call, an intake specialist located in West Virginia, asked the caller for information about Cruz, and whether he had made any threats of violence or “talk about ISIS.”

The tipster, whose name is redacted from the transcript but identified as an "unknown female," said Cruz “expresses different things” on social media “and then he takes it off.”

“Just recently, now he has switched it to he wants to kill people. And then he put that on his Instagram and about two days later, he took it off,” the tipster said.

The tipster described Cruz as a violent child who killed animals, posted frequently about firearms and ISIS, and was “thrown out of all these schools because he would pick up a chair and just throw it at somebody, a teacher or a student because he didn’t like the way they were talking to him.”

“It’s alarming to see these pictures and to know what he’s capable of doing and-and what could happen,” the tipster told the FBI on the call, according to a transcript reviewed by ABC News. ”I just think about, you know, getting into a school and just shooting the place up.”

The caller, who dialed the FBI on January 5th, left her name with the FBI for follow up questions and also identified the officer she had spoken with at the Parkland Police Department, who she had given “all the information I had.”

“I didn’t know whether to call you or Homeland Security or who, but like I said … when you look into this you can make the decision as to whether you want to go further or not,” the tipster told the FBI in the call.

“I just want to, you know, get it off my chest in case something does happen and I do believe something’s going to happen,” the tipster said.

The intake specialist did not say if the agency would be following up with the caller.

The FBI has admitted to not following proper protocol after the shooting at the high school last week that left 17 people dead, and properly following up on the Jan. 5 call to the tip line.

The FBI has admitted to not following proper protocol after the shooting at the high school last week that left 17 people dead, and properly following up on the Jan. 5 call to the tip line.

“We have determined that these protocols were not followed for the information received by the PAL on January 5. The information was not provided to the Miami field office, and no further investigation was conducted at that time,” the FBI said in a statement last week.

FBI Director Christopher Wray has come under fire for the episode, including from Florida Gov. Rick Scott, who has called for Wray to resign over the FBI’s “failure to take action.”

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Anthony Watson(NEW YORK) -- Flooding remains a big threat from Texas to Michigan to Pennsylvania where relentless rounds of heavy rain keeps falling over the same areas, causing streams and rivers to continue to rise right into the weekend. Flood watches are still in effect Friday from Texas to Pennsylvania and will likely stay up into the weekend for the next round of rain on Saturday into Sunday.

Twenty-two rivers across the country are currently in "major flood stage," with the majority of those being in northern Indiana and southern Michigan: The Yellow River, St. Joseph River, and Kankakee Rivers in Northern Illinois are all in major- and record-flood stage and will remain that way for the next few days.

From the Rockies to the Upper Midwest, winter weather advisories and winter storm watches are in effect for a new storm to bring a blast of snow on Saturday.

A new storm will bring more flooding rain, heavy snow, and severe weather across the country over the weekend. By Saturday afternoon, more heavy rain stretches from Texas to Pennsylvania with severe weather in the South. On the wintry side of the storm, snow will move across the central and Northern Plains, from Omaha to Minneapolis by Saturday afternoon into the evening.

Severe weather is possible Saturday afternoon and evening from Dallas to Louisville, with an enhanced threat from Little Rock to Memphis to Evansville. Damaging winds and a few strong tornadoes are all possible, along with isolated instances of large hail and flash flooding during the heaviest downpours. Storm timing for the enhanced area will be between 4:00 p.m. and midnight.

Looking ahead to Sunday the cold front will swing eastward with a line of heavy rain from New Orleans to New York as most of the wintry precipitation will be confined to northern New England.

Snow across the Midwest could exceed 6 inches for parts of Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Iowa where the winter storm watches are in effect. Another 3 to 5 inches of rain is possible from Oklahoma to Kentucky as the flooding risk continues through Saturday.

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ABC News(PARKLAND, Fla.) -- John Cohen and his police officer partner responded to a call for help to thwart a rape in progress, and after pulling the suspect off of the victim and physically getting control of the suspect, Cohen realized he should have had help.

Cohen said that incident, which happened back when he was a police officer in Southern California in the 1980s, was the first of two times that he felt his partner froze on him.

“I was conscious of the fact that my partner was not with me,” said Cohen, a former police officer who is now an ABC News contributor

After the second incident, Cohen told his sergeant that “as much as I liked the person,” he couldn’t work with the partner anymore.

“As a police officer inevitably you will be forced to confront a situation which requires you to make a split second decision that very well may put your life in jeopardy but may allow you to capture a dangerous suspect or save someone else. I have seen many officers who are able to do that but I have also seen some officers who weren’t,” Cohen said.

Law enforcement officers freezing under pressure has come into the spotlight after reports that the school resource officer at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, did not go into the building when the deadly shooting was unfolding.

The exact hesitations or reasoning that prompted Deputy Scott Peterson, who worked as the school resource officer (SRO) at the high school, remain unknown. Peterson was suspended without pay from the Broward County Sheriff’s Office after it was made clear that he remained outside of the building where the shooting was happening for more than four minutes. Peterson met the requirements for retirement and has since resigned.

“He should have went in, addressed the killer, killed the killer,” Sheriff Scott Israel said Thursday in a news conference announcing Peterson’s suspension and retirement.

President Donald Trump has weighed in on the situation, commenting multiple times on Friday about Peterson’s inaction, saying that “turned out to be not good,” adding that he was either a “coward” or someone who froze under pressure.

Peterson received praise from Jeff Bell, the head of the Broward Sheriff’s Office Deputies Association, for “calling the exact location and getting units out there,” he told ABC News. But Bell added that as first responders they’re trained to go into active shooting situations so if they don’t, it should be viewed as a failure.

Cohen said that he “could make the case either way” for the officer entering the building or to wait for back up, noting that “at the end of the day it’s going to be up to that officer in that situation to make the decision.”

Steve Gomez, a former police officer and FBI special agent in charge who is now an ABC News contributor, said that Peterson’s background could play a role in his decision-making process under pressure.

Peterson worked at the sheriff’s department since 1985 and is believed to have served as an SRO for several years.

Gomez explained that Peterson's lengthy experience at the school would have benefits and drawbacks.

“There’s definitely a benefit of him being assigned to the school for a number of years because he has historical knowledge of how the school functions, he knows the kids and the faculty which means that he is able to develop relationships that will allow him to gather info that would be helpful to secure the school,” Gomez told ABC News.

However, he pointed to beat street cops who “respond to domestic violence calls, crime suppression, or just even pulling over a vehicle with the risk of that vehicle having a criminal and a gun” as examples of those who have experience not freezing.

“Those officers are experiencing high stress, highly dangerous situations on a daily basis so they have no time to freeze,” Gomez said. “My thought is that if he had been away from fighting crime the way most patrol officers deal with crime on a daily basis then he may have been less ready to deal with an active shooter situation at the school.”

Gomez added that conversations about freezing under pressure are ones that “you tend to have with someone at the beginning of their career.” He recalled a fellow police officer, who just months into the job, quit the force shortly after his vehicle was shot while patrolling in a heavy crime area.

"He resigned due to the fear of him getting killed and what that would do to his family that he would leave behind," Gomez said.

Similarly, Cohen said that he personally had to face down an “overwhelming, paralyzing fear” at times during his years in law enforcement.

“I remember times when I would be driving into work, thinking about my family, thinking about things I may confront at work,” Cohen said. “You pull over to the side of the road and think, ‘What am I doing? Why am I doing this?’”

Both Cohen and Gomez agreed that any internal hesitations need to be assessed and addressed before a life-or-death situation unfolds while the officer is on duty.

“This kind of situation may not have been expected by somebody with 30-plus years on the job,” Gomez said.

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Mike Blake /Pool/Getty Images(RIVERSIDE, Calif.) -- Some of the 13 siblings allegedly held captive by their parents in their California home are "starting to make plans for their future," Corona Mayor Karen Spiegel told ABC News on Friday.

"Their minds are just being opened," she said, to "having a choice and not being so controlled."

The young adult victims are now "getting up and making the day happen for themselves, getting out of bed and deciding what they want to eat."

"They're starting from very elementary stuff," she said, but have "progressed very, very well."

David and Louise Turpin are accused of abusing their children, including in some cases allegedly forcing them to shower only once a year, shackling them and beating them routinely, prosecutors said. The victims weren't released from their chains even to go to the bathroom, according to prosecutors.

When found last month, the children hadn't been to a doctor in over four years and had never been to a dentist, prosecutors said.

The Turpins were arrested in January after the couple’s 17-year-old daughter escaped the home and alerted authorities.

All the children except for the youngest, a toddler, were severely malnourished, prosecutors said. The eldest victim -- a 29-year-old woman -- weighed only 82 pounds when rescued.

David and Louise Turpin have each been charged with 12 counts of torture, 12 counts of false imprisonment, seven counts of abuse of a dependent adult and six counts of child abuse. David Turpin was also charged with one count of a lewd act on a child under the age of 14 by force, fear or duress. They have pleaded not guilty.

The Turpins made a brief appearance in court on Friday, where neither spoke. They will return for a settlement conference hearing set for March 23. Three additional charges of abuse were filed against both David and Louise Turpin on Friday, and one new count of felony assault was filed against just Louise Turpin.

They pleaded not guilty to all new charges.

Meanwhile, the siblings are recovering in hospitals.

The adult victims have Skyped with their younger siblings as they have been separated to two different hospitals, Spiegel said, adding that they have put on weight.

Some of the siblings "didn't really know what a toothbrush was used for," Spiegel said.

Some of the victims had never had shoes, Spiegel said, recounting how when one boy was given his first shoes, they were too tight, but he wouldn't relinquish them until a bigger pair arrived because he was scared he would never get shoes back.

Spiegel described the young adult victims as "so loving and warm and affectionate," and said they appreciate the "things we take for granted."

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images(PARKLAND, Fla.) -- The armed school resource officer who officials say did not enter the school during last week's mass shooting in Florida had received positive evaluations and feedback from his colleagues, according to his personnel file.

Deputy Scot Peterson began working at Florida's Broward Sheriff’s Department in 1985 and completed multiple training programs, including a mandatory firearms training program and special tactical problems training program.

Peterson was named Parkland district employee of the month in May 2012 and was recognized as school resource officer of the year in 2014.

Peterson "takes pride in protecting the students, faculty and staff at his school. Deputy Peterson is dependable and reliable and handles issues that arise with tact and solid judgment," according to one evaluation.

An internal memo dated March 2017 said, “Peterson is a positive influence on the students and they respect and appreciate his position.”

The 2017 memo also shows Peterson was nominated for Parkland deputy of the year.

Seventeen people were fatally shot in the Valentine's Day massacre. The suspect allegedly fled after the shooting but was later apprehended.

A decision to suspend Peterson was made after reviewing video from the shooting and taking statements from witnesses and Peterson himself, Broward Sheriff Scott Israel announced Thursday. Since he met the requirements for retirement, Peterson opted to resign after he was told he was being suspended, Israel said.

Law enforcement officials who reviewed the video say Peterson arrived at the west side of Building 12, where most of the killing happened. He then took up a position but "never went in," officials said. The video has not been released publicly.

The video shows that Peterson remained outside the building for upward of four minutes during the shooting, which lasted about six minutes, Israel said. Aside from getting "on his radio," Peterson did "nothing" while standing outside the building, Israel said.

“He should have went in, addressed the killer, killed the killer,” Israel said.

When asked by reporters to describe how the video made him feel, Israel responded, "sick to my stomach" and "devastated."

"It doesn’t matter who went in first, it doesn’t matter in what order you went in," he said. "What matters is that when we in law enforcement arrive at an active shooter, we go in and address the target and that’s what should have been done."

It is still unclear why Peterson did not go after the shooter.

President Donald Trump on Friday slammed Peterson for his response, saying, "When it came time to get in there and do something, he didn't have the courage or something happened."

"He certainly did a poor job," Trump said. "That's the case where somebody was outside. They're trained, they didn't react properly under pressure or they were a coward. It was a real shock to the police department."

Broward Schools Superintendent Robert Runcie said at a news conference Friday that Peterson's actions were “outrageous” and “inexcusable,” adding, “I’ll leave it at that. I have no words.”

When asked about Peterson’s praise in the past, he responded, “I don’t care about the past. Just care about the actions that he took that day.”

Runcie said there was nothing inhibiting Peterson from entering the school.

“I wish he had the same kind of courage that our teachers have,” Runcie said.

Jeff Bell, the president of Broward Sheriff’s Office Deputies Association, told ABC News that Peterson "did do a good job in terms of calling the exact location and getting units out there."

Teacher Jim Gard told ABC News he is "completely and totally disgusted" that Peterson allegedly stayed outside the building, calling it "beyond comprehensible."

Recent graduate Megan Leahy told ABC News, "You're a police officer -- your number one job is to protect. And to hear he didn't go in the school, that's your job -- that's what you signed up for."

"Mr. [Christopher] Hixon did, and Coach [Aaron] Feis," she said, referring to two staff members who were killed. "They went in. They protected us. ... Tried."

But recent graduate Zachary Knecht added, "You never know what's going through someone's mind ... I don't know if I can say what he was thinking."

ABC News has reached out to Peterson for comment.

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iStock/Thinkstock(PARKLAND, Fla.) -- A Florida police officer was overcome with emotion as he described responding to last week's mass shooting at a high school, where his wife and son were on lockdown inside.

"It was surreal," Coral Springs police Sgt. Jeff Heinrich said at a news conference this morning, telling his story through tears.

Heinrich was off duty on Valentine's Day but happened to be watering the baseball field at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, where his wife is an assistant athletic director and his son is a student, when the shooting happened.

Heinrich said he heard the fire alarm go off and then gunshots, but at first he thought it was fireworks. He noticed students walking to the parking lot were relaxed as if was a usual fire drill.

Then, the children started to run and scream and he heard a round of five or six shots, Heinrich said.

Heinrich said he ran toward the parking lot where the students were and found a student named Kyle who had a gunshot wound to his ankle. Heinrich grabbed Kyle and took him to the baseball area, where he said he used a first-aid kit at the clubhouse to treat him.

Kyle, while seriously injured, managed to give Heinrich a great description of what was going on and what the shooter was wearing, which Heinrich then relayed to the dispatcher, he said.

Kyle survived and remains in the hospital, Heinrich said.

Heinrich, emotional and holding back tears told reporters, “I called my wife. Luckily I was able to get ahold of her. By the grace of God my wife and my son who are on opposite ends of the school ... they both heard the fire alarm and decided to evacuate.”

His wife and son found each other and were able to shelter in place together with other teachers and students, Heinrich said, crying.

Heinrich said he continued to work the rest of the day and didn't reunite with his family until 10 p.m.

Officer Chris Crawford, a former Marine, was also among the officers sharing their stories.

Crawford said he rescued a 14-year-old boy who had been shot several times. He was trying to get the teen to where the fire department was, but the boy told him he couldn’t breathe or walk, he said. When Crawford put him down, he said he found injuries to his back, shoulder, thigh and arm.

"It’s awful," Crawford said. "It’s as bad as you can imagine -- times 10.”

Crawford also said when he knocked on one class door and identified himself, the students pushed desks up against the door and refused to let him in. Crawford said the students made him pass his ID to them and read off his ID number to provide his identity.

Crawford said his wife is a detective and he's a father of a 2-year-old.

"I don’t want to send him to school," Crawford said.

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Jon Kaupp(GRAND JUNCTION, Colo.) -- A search and rescue effort is underway after a single-engine Piper aircraft with four people onboard went missing after departing Grand Junction, Colorado, around 10 a.m. local time Thursday, officials said.

The Federal Aviation Administration confirmed that the aircraft was missing and issued an alert.

Jon Kaupp, the son of pilot Bill Kaupp, told ABC News that his 65-year-old father was planning to fly another son, 28-year-old Clint Kaupp, and their respective best friends west over Moab, Utah, before turning south to their destination of Albuquerque, New Mexico. The other passengers were Tim Mueller, 28, and Ron McKenzie, 66, according to Jon Kaupp.

Bill Kaupp has been an "avid" aviator for the last 10 years, said Jon Kaupp.

Search and rescue efforts are being coordinated by the Civil Air Patrol, an auxiliary of the United States Air Force.

It's unclear if Bill Kaupp was familiar with that area of Colorado and Utah.

There was light snow and mist in Grand Junction Thursday morning, but no significant storms, according to ABC News meteorologists.

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images(PARKLAND, Fla.) -- Gov. Rick Scott announced Friday that he is going to push to raise the firearm purchase age in Florida from 18 to 21 years old in the wake of the deadly school shooting last week.

"Change is coming, and it will come fast," Scott said.

Scott, a Republican with an A rating from the National Rifle Association, announced the age increase as part of a series of steps he wants the state to take on gun laws, school safety and mental health.

He started his news conference Friday by reading the names of the 17 students and school staff who were killed at the Feb. 14 shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland.

"Unfortunately, none of the plans I’m announcing today will bring any of them back, but it’s important to remember them. The 17 lives that were cut short and all the hopes and dreams that were ruined have changed our state forever. Florida will never be the same," Scott said.

He called for the institution of what he termed a "violent threat restraining order" -- similar versions of which are in place in some states. The order would allow a court to stop a mentally ill or violent person from buying a gun after a family member, community welfare expert or law enforcement officer files a request to instate the order.

"I want to make it virtually impossible for anyone who has mental issues to use a gun. I want to make it virtually impossible for anyone who is a danger to themselves or others to use a gun," Scott said.

He also called for a strengthening of the restrictions that should stop mentally ill individuals from buying guns.

The age hike that would stop someone from buying a gun before they are 21 would have exceptions "for active-duty and reserve military and spouses, National Guard members and law enforcement," Scott said.

Scott's list of proposals also included an outright ban of bump stocks, which were not believed to have been used in the Parkland shooting but gained infamy following the deadly shooting at a Las Vegas concert in October.

He also detailed his plans to increase security precautions and training at schools. He said he will push to have more law enforcement officers at schools, suggesting that there be at least one law enforcement officer for every 1,000 students. Scott also called for a mandatory implementation of active-shooter "code red" drills at the beginning of each semester at public schools.

Scott said he and Florida lawmakers would be discussing the plans in Tallahassee, the state capital, during the next two weeks while the state government is still in its legislative session.

"I will not accept the old, tired political notion that we don’t have enough time to get anything done. Government does not have to be slow or lethargic. And when it comes to protecting our schools and our kids, we need to be swift and decisive," Scott said.

He noted that the ideas he mentioned amount to "half a billion dollars for school safety and mental health initiatives," and he said that "if providing this funding means we won’t be able to cut taxes this year -- so be it."

The announcement comes the same morning that some staff members returned to Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, nine days after the shooting.

Teachers were seen hugging as they arrived back at the school in the wake of the Valentine's Day massacre.

Staff members had the option to go back to the school Friday, and all staff is expected to return on Monday and Tuesday for planning days ahead of classes, Broward County Public Schools said.

A "variety of support services" is available, the district said.

The school district, calling this an "emotional and difficult recovery process," is also holding a voluntary campus orientation for students and parents Sunday afternoon.

Classes for students will resume on Wednesday with a modified, shorter schedule for the week, the district said.

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Ramsay Family (PARKLAND, Fla.) -- Seventeen-year-old Helena Ramsay, one of the 17 people gunned down in the Valentine's Day mass shooting at a Florida high school, will be laid to rest on Friday.

Ramsay was a "smart, kind-hearted and thoughtful person" who would have started college next year, relative Curtis Page Jr. wrote on Facebook.

"She was deeply loved and loved others even more so," he wrote, adding, "She was so brilliant and witty, and I’m still wrestling with the idea that she is actually gone."

According to The Orlando Sentinel, a cousin, Jamie Page, wrote online that Helena was “a genuine, beautiful and smart human being who had so much potential and the brightest future.”

The newspaper said cousin Fena Cooper posted on Facebook, “Valentine’s Day will never look the same for my family."

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images(PARKLAND, Fla.) -- Staff members returned to Florida's Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on Friday morning, nine days after 17 people were fatally shot on the high school campus.

Teachers were seen hugging as they arrived back at the school in the wake of the Valentine's Day massacre.

Friday is "dedicated to meeting staff members’ needs, with a variety of support services available on campus," according to Broward County Public Schools.

The school district, calling this a "long and emotional recovery process," is also holding a voluntary campus orientation for students and parents Sunday afternoon.

The district is aiming for classes to resume on Feb. 27.

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Mike Stocker-Pool/Getty Images(PARKLAND, Fla.) -- A Marjory Stoneman Douglas school resource officer has been suspended without pay after Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel said video shows him taking up a defensive position during the shooting but never entering the school.

Israel announced Thursday that the decision to suspend Deputy Scot Peterson was made after reviewing video from the shooting and taking statements from witnesses and Peterson himself, Israel said.

“He should have went in, addressed the killer, killed the killer,” Israel said.

Peterson was armed and on campus during the shooting, Israel said. Since he met the requirements for retirement, Peterson opted to resign after he was told he was being suspended, Israel said.

Israel said the video shows Peterson arrived at the west side of Building 12, where most of the killing happened. He then took up a position but "never went in."

The video shows that Peterson remained outside the building for upward of four minutes during the shooting, which lasted about six minutes, Israel said. Aside from getting "on his radio," Peterson did "nothing" while standing outside the building, Israel said.

When the shooting started, Peterson was in an office dealing with a "school-related issue," Israel said.

When asked by reporters to describe how the video made him feel, Israel said "sick to my stomach" and "devastated."

"It doesn’t matter who went in first. It doesn’t matter in what order you went in," he said. "What matters is that when we in law enforcement arrive at an active shooter, we go in and address the target -- and that’s what should have been done."

Peterson was named school resource officer of the year in the city of Parkland in 2014, after he had been with the school for five years, records show. According to a booklet announcing the award, Peterson had been "proven to be reliable in handling issues with tact and judgment" and was active in mentoring and counseling students that year.

Peterson was also nominated for Parkland deputy of the year in 2017, an internal memo from the sheriff's office dated March 27, 2017, shows. He started his career with the Broward County Sheriff's Office in 1985.

The personnel file on Peterson shows he completed multiple training programs as well, including a mandatory firearms training program and special tactical problems training program.

Two other deputies were placed on restricted duty while the sheriff's office investigates whether they "could've" or "should've" done more while dealing with the suspect, 19-year-old Nikolas Cruz, amid the 23 calls they received involving Cruz or his brother since 2008, Israel said.

Of those calls, investigators feel that two cases "deserve extra scrutiny" to see if there was a policy violation by the deputies involved.

Cruz was arrested shortly after the shooting and is charged with 17 counts of premeditated murder. He is being held in a Broward County jail.

On Wednesday, Israel announced that Broward County sheriff's deputies would now be carrying AR-15 rifles on school grounds within the district, adding that one of the ways to make schools safer is to evaluate the number of school resource officers on campuses.


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KABC-TV(LOS ANGELES) -- Nearly 300 Los Angeles County residents evacuated their homes Thursday after an uncontrollable blaze erupted from an apartment complex unit and quickly spread throughout the entire building, authorities said.

The fire began around 3:30 p.m. along a block in Pico Rivera, according to ABC Los Angeles station KABC-TV. The fire is reportedly believed to have started inside a vacant room on the third floor of the complex and then spread throughout the remainder of the sprawling H-shaped structure.

Building tenant Jesse Aguilar, who witnessed the fire’s eruption, said he attempted to battle the flames with a fire extinguisher.

"By the time I got there, the flames were already too much,” he told KABC-TV. “I saw the whole side of the wall just catch on fire. I started spraying the fire extinguisher on it, and it was just too much. After I did that, the ceiling came down, and when it came down, that's when the fire department told me to evacuate.”

Aguilar alerted other residents, he said, telling people to evacuate in order to spare them from the fast-moving fire.

Two people were transported to a nearby hospital to receive treatment for smoke inhalation, and a firefighter was treated for heat exhaustion, authorities said.

About 220 firefighters were on the scene working to quell the flames and save as many units as possible. At least 45 units were damaged by smoke and fire, and 141 units lost power or sustained other damages, according to authorities.

Residents displaced by the fire recounted the chaos they witnessed while scrambling to flee to safety and salvage all they could.

Tenant Rachael Cervantes, who fled with her family, said, “As soon as we opened the door, the smoke started coming into our apartment. We didn’t have time. We didn’t know what to do. We just grabbed our dogs and got out of there.”

As the hundreds of displaced residents begin an effort to rebuild their lives, shelters in the Pico Rivera area have opened their doors to provide refuge and gather donations.

The cause of the fire is unknown and remains under investigation, KABC-TV reported.

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ABC News(NEW YORK) -- A stalled frontal system continues to plague much of the central U.S. with heavy rain in the south, and snow and ice in parts of the Northern Plains and upper Midwest.

A line of strong storms remains situated Friday morning over the south-central U.S. from northeast Texas all the way to southern Ohio. Heavy rain is accompanying these storms with rainfall rates of half an inch to three-quarters of an inch per hour. The threat for flash flooding is increasing in parts of Kentucky, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Tennessee and Arkansas on Friday morning.

This stalled storm system is also bringing some snow to the upper Midwest on Friday morning with 1 to 2 inch per hour snowfall rates locally.

While the system moves to the north and east on Friday, another storm is developing right behind it that will bring a significant flood risk from Texas to Pennsylvania this weekend.

Severe weather -- including tornadoes -- across the lower Mississippi River Valley and significant snow from Nebraska to Wisconsin are possible.

By Saturday morning, heavy rain will be falling on parts of the Ohio River Valley, and new thunderstorms will develop across parts of Texas. Meanwhile, snow and ice will begin to cover parts of the Central Plains across Nebraska and Iowa. This slow-moving storm will move across the central U.S. this weekend.

The primary concern would be the next round of very heavy rainfall from Texas to Pennsylvania; these areas have already been hard hit this week. Nearly 4 to 5 inches of additional rainfall is possible through Monday morning, especially from Arkansas to Ohio. Significant flash flooding and river flooding could happen in the region. Rainfall rates during some of these storms, especially on Saturday, could exceed 1 to 2 inches per hour.

The only good news is that the heaviest rain will miss most of central Illinois and central Michigan -- an area that was hard hit with river flooding this week already.

On the colder side of this system, additional snow is on the way for the Central Plains and Upper Midwest. An additional 6 to 10 inches of snow is expected from northern Iowa to Wisconsin and Minnesota, including Minneapolis. The snow will reach peak intensity on Saturday afternoon and evening with blowing snow likely in the cities of Minneapolis and Eau Claire, Wisconsin.

Patchy ice will also be possible once again in parts of the Kansas City region.

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iStock/Thinkstock(ROSSVILLE, Ind.) -- There were no survivors of a small plane crash in rural Indiana on Thursday night.

Indiana State Police told Indianapolis ABC affiliate WRTV that at least three people died in the crash.

The Cessna 441 plane left from Eagle Creek Airport in Indianapolis at 7:21 p.m. before crashing in a field north of Rossville, Indiana, on its way to Green Bay, Wisconsin, just 18 minutes later, according to WRTV.

"Unfortunately, when officers responded to the area near 500 West and 500 South in a field, they did find a plane that did crash. And, unfortunately at this time, there are fatalities, “Indiana Police Sgt. Tony Slocum said. "We believe there are no survivors in this crash."

Rossville is in rural Carroll County, about 50 miles northwest of Indianapolis.

Investigators with the Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board were expected to be on the scene of the crash on Friday, WRTV reported.

No one on the ground was injured.

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onePULSE Foundation (ORLANDO) -- Construction begins Monday in Orlando on an interim memorial to pay tribute to the 49 people who were killed 20 months ago during a shooting massacre at Pulse nightclub, a popular LGBT venue in the city's downtown, the onePULSE Foundation announced Thursday.

"As we move to create a permanent memorial and museum to honor the 49 precious lives that were taken, we also know the importance of ensuring the families, survivors, first responders and the community continue to have a place to reflect on what happened here," onePULSE Foundation Executive Director Barbara Poma said in a statement.

Poma continued, "The interim memorial will provide areas to leave messages, and will include seating, shade, lighting and trees -- creating a meaningful and inviting space while planning is underway."

The onePULSE Foundation is a nonprofit organization incorporated to manage the design and construction of a permanent museum and memorial dedicated to the Pulse tragedy.

Forty-nine people were killed, and more than 100 others were injured on June 12, 2016, when gunman Omar Mateen opened fire on the nightclub. The federal trial for Mateen's wife, Noor Salman, begins March 1. She faces charges of aiding a former terrorist organization and obstruction of justice.

As part of the process of creating the interim memorial, the onePULSE Foundation will work with the Orange County Regional History Center to collect and conserve all of the artifacts, works of art, messages and other memorial items left at the site. Families and survivors have been invited to take home any personal items and messages they left at the site. Orange County Regional History Center staff will collect the remaining items on Feb. 25.

Pam Schwartz, chief curator of the Orange County Regional History Center, said in a statement that June 12, 2016, was "an historic day in Orlando’s history, and we are dedicated to ensuring that the lives taken, all those affected and the outpouring of public support are not forgotten."

Schwartz added, "We will use the utmost care and sensitivity in preserving the items that were so lovingly created and placed here; they will be integral as the onePULSE Foundation plans the museum.”

The onePULSE Foundation reviewed and approved the interim design.

The onePULSE Foundation explained in a statement that "the iconic Pulse sign will be enhanced but not removed. A new fence will be placed around the perimeter of the nightclub itself, which will remain standing until the permanent memorial and museum designs are selected. Much of the labor involved will be completed off-site, and new elements will be installed at the site with minimal impact on the surrounding community."

Work on the project is expected to last approximately 60 days and should end in late April, according to the foundation.

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